CUSD SOLAR PANEL PROJECT- DYSFUNCTIONAL CA

The State of California is enjoying record high revenues.

Revenues have increased by $66 billion since 2007-08.

$55 billion of that new revenue is sitting in the High Speed Rail Account.

The California Constitution mandates that the number one priority for spending tax dollars is public education. It is the State of California's obligation to fund K-12 Public schools with sufficient funding to provide every student with opportunity to obtain High Quality Staff- Beneficial Teacher/Pupil Ratios- Program Expansion and Variety- Modern Equipment and Materials and High Quality Buildings. 

See: Invidious Discrimination Slide Presentation

Instead, Sacramento is taking tax dollars away from Prop 98 minimum guarantee and forcing school districts to spend tax dollars on Green Energy Projects rather than on facilities maintenance and in the classroom. California Public Schools are on the verge of bankruptcy and their facilities have not been fixed or maintained for so long that they threaten the health and safety of students and staff. California taxpayers now understand that one of the major causes for all of the recent wildfires is the lack of infrastructure spending on 100 + year old power lines and towers. Instead, Sacramento forced power companys to spend money on renewable energy projects. 

Sacramento has done the same thing to Public education. Prop 39 is one example.

From Ed Source: LAO has 'serious concerns' with governor's Prop 98 Calculation

LAO Report Prop 39

PROP 39 GRANT REVENUES  

(EEP) Energy Expenditure Plan Amount Approved

$10,601,781.00
2013-14 Allocation  $2,097,901.00
2014-15 Allocation  $1,829,324.00
2015-16 Allocation  $1,651,437.00
2016-17 Allocation  $2,546,996.00
2017-18 Allocation $2,414,706.00
Total Prop 39 Grant Funds $10,540,346.00
EEP Amount Remaining $690,787.00

FEDERAL CLEAN RENEWABLE ENERGY BONDS 

August 15, 2017 in the amount of $23.87 million

$21,705,000.00 CREB BOND DEBT Funds were deposited December 21, 2017

Total (CREB Bond Funds) $23,870,000
STATE MODERNIZATION FUNDS
Total Modernization Funds $10,000,000
UTILITY PROVIDER SUBSIDIES
LED Lighting Rebates $7,233 $535,272
BAS Rebates  $442,342
BAS Rebates (tentative) $85,697
FEDERAL CREB BOND SUBSIDIES
Federal CREB Bond Subsidies $8,300,000
Total Funding for Prop 39 Projects  $53,245,618

 

Estimated Annual Savings  
Phase I  LED Lighting at 6 High Schools (completed Feb 2017)  $226,733
Phase II  Building Automation Systems (Carrier I-Vu Standard) at 5 High Schools / LED Lighting at Dana Hills HS, SchoolDude Energy Module Software Program (completed March 2018)  $442,342
Phase III  Building Automation Systems (Carrier I-Vu Standard) and LED External Lighting (est complete by 9/18)  $217,522
Total  Annual Savings  $886,579
Savings over 25 years $25,692

 

Estimated Annual Savings per year Solar Project
Aliso Niguel High School  $119,639 
Capistrno Valley High School  ($25,216)
Dana Hills High School   $18,437
San Clemente High School   $31,140
San Juan Hills High School   $135,817
Tesoro High School   $90,984
Total $370,801
Savings over 25 years $9,270,025

 

Total Estimated Annual Energy Savings  
Phase I II and III  $886,579
Solar $370,801
DIstrict Office (No Data) ?
Total  Annual Savings $1,257,380
Savings over 25 years $31,434,500

 

CUSD is saving $1.2 million per year which can be used to continue to bring facilities up to minimum health and safety standards.

PROP 39 PROJECT EXPENSES
Schneider Electric $9,116,186.00
REC Solar $18,331,424.26
Arc Alternatives  $205,055.00
Government Financial Stragtegies $9,000.00
CJ Construction Management $447,000.00
Placeworks $88,388.00
Ninyo & Moore Geotech $134,842.00
AW Industries $310,000.00
School Facilities Consultants $9,750.00
Telacu Construction Management $389,440.00
US Bank $3,600.00
Total  $29,044,685.26

 

Where did the $24 million dollars go?

Did you know that CUSD can use Prop 39 funds to pay for HVAC Systems - every mechanical system in the District is at or past its useful life according to the Kitchell School Facility Reports.

Why would CUSD elect to REPAIR HVAC systems when they are past their useful life, and they have this extra $24 million they could spend to buy new HVAC systems?

Rather than use the $24 million to fix PRIORITY I Mechanical System they put this $24 million in the General Fund to use for their annual across board compensation increases.  They chose instead, to place a Local School Facility Bond on the March 2020 Ballot totaling $420 million dollars. 

The Cost to Fix PRIORITY ONE mechanical systems

$16 million

Conditions in this category require immediate action to:

a) correct a cited safety hazard,

b) stop accelerated deterioration, and/or

c) return a facility to operation.

The Escalation Factor in this category is 5%. Deficiencies in this category should be addressed in Year 1.

Year 1 was 2017 (3 years ago)

Aliso Niguel High School page 11  

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in operational condition and will need to be replaced within a five-year period.

  Heating System  $102,300
  Cooling System  $4,440,300
  Facility HVAC Distribution  $369,000.00
  Ventilation   $313,100.00
   Total $5,224,700

Capistrano Valley High School  page 11

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in fair operational condition. The majority of the mechanical equipment is at or past its expected useful service life and will need to be replaced within a five-year period. It was also observed that a few of the units had disconnected condensate drain lines.

  Heating System  $230,900
  Cooling System  $2,213,400
  Facility HVAC Distribution $300,300
  Ventilation  $448,900
  Total $3,193,500

Dana Hills High School

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in operational condition. The majority of the mechanical equipment is at or past its expected useful service life and will need to be replaced within a five-year period.

  Heating System  $178,200
  Cooling System  $1,469,300
  Facility HVAC Distribution $756,200
  Ventilation  $218,600
  Total $2,622,300

San Clemente High School page 11

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in fair to poor operational condition and should be replaced within a five-year period. A majority of the mechanical equipment is past the end of their expected useful service lives with more than three roof top packaged air conditioning units that were inoperable at the time
of the assessment.

  Heating System Not Mentioned?
  Cooling System  $2,802,300
  Facility HVAC Distribution $1,993,400
  Ventilation  $212,900
  Total $5,008,600

San Juan Hills High School page 11 

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in good operational condition. They appear to be properly maintained however, a majority of the mechanical equipment is approaching its expected useful service life and will need to be replaced within a five-year period.

  Heating System -0-
  Cooling System  $16,500
  Facility HVAC Distribution -0-
  Ventilation  -0-
  Total $16,500

Tesoro High School page 11

Overall, the mechanical systems appear to be in operational condition. However, all air conditioning systems on the rooftops and the utility exhaust fans over the gymnasium are at the end of their expected useful service lives and need to be replaced.

  Heating System -0-
  Cooling System -0-
  Facility HVAC Distribution -0-
  Ventilation  -0-
  Total -0-
Grand Total $16,065,600

                   A Message to the Board of Trustees at the                     Capistrano Unified School District

It is the responsibility of the CUSD Board of Trustees to ensure that students and staff have facilities that are safe and well maintained. Trustees are responsible for maintaining and repairing facilities within the annual operating budget

Instead, Trustees have provided across the board compensation increases every year since the great recession.

Superintendent Vital is paid $100,000 more than her counterparts in LAUSD and San Diego Unified.

CUSD has just placed 2 school facility bonds on the March 2020 ballot totaling $420 million dollars. Much of what is proposed in the bond language are repairs to bring CUSD facilities up to minimum health and safety standards.

Resolution No. 1920-29 executed 

Screen_Shot_2019-11-16_at_5.13.18_AM.png

Resolution No. 1920-30 executed

Screen_Shot_2019-11-16_at_5.14.16_AM.png

As taxpayers, we rely on the Board of Trustees to be our voice to the State of California. We rely on the Board of Trustees to make use of any and all tools at their disposal to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff. For instance, the Williams Settlement requires that schools be kept in "good repair". It provides a mechanism that school districts can use to obtain the necessary funds to ensure that all students have access to school facilities that are clean, safe, and functional (working plumbing, roofs that do not leak and HVAC systems that are operational).

Taxpayers should not be required to come in "after the fact" and finance repairs in the form of a long term (30 year) bond measure.

It is not good governance to finance what should have been short term repairs into long term debt. 

Local Governments should be extremely concerned about the amount of "local debt" California School districts are accumulating. California has over $1.3 trillion dollars of debt, and most of it is from California public schools. Local School Facility bonds make up $337 billion of that debt.

 SEE: Funding from Local School Facility Bonds

NO MORE BONDS - NO MORE DEBT

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEEDS TO HONOR ITS COMMITMENT TO CALIFORNIA TAXPAYERS. SACRAMENTO CANNOT CONTINUE TO USE TAXPAYER MONEY TO FUND NEW PROGRAMS AND ENTITLEMENTS THAT ARE NOT CONSTITUTIONALLY MANDATED.

FIX SACRAMENTO!

STOP ABUSING TAXPAYERS!

 

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION:

PROP 39 Green Energy Projects Time-line 2012- 2017

PROP 39 Green Energy Projects Time-line 2017 - the present