Under "Local Control", the LCAP is the only tool that the State of California gives to the Public to ensure transparency in how a district sets it's educational priorities, and how district funds are spent to ensure those priorities are met.

Unfortunately, this appears to be nothing more than a blank check for public employee unions, and leaves the public with no recourse if they happen to live in a District that does not "HEAR" the input of the Public.

Why California's LCAP does not work. A case study: The Capistrano Unified School District in Orange County California 

CUSD has insufficient funding to pay for district funded Art, Music or Science (core educational classes that are required by the state for any student to receive a “minimum” education).

CUSD has facilities that have not been fixed or maintained for 15 years.

CUSD students attend school in overcrowded classrooms with staff to student ratios that are not safe.

CUSD has limited programing based on the Canadian model of education and the work of Michael Fullan. Michael Fullan’s work is based on the belief that Professional Development is the number one priority for an educational institution. Class size and differentiated learning do not matter. In alignment with these beliefs, CUSD Staff has eliminated funding for GATE, and other programming for high achieving students.

CUSD is the only District in South Orange County that does not offer a Geometry Honors class.

CUSD is the only district that requires CCP/Stand Alone Health as a graduation requirement.

As a result of these “unique” curriculum choices, the academic performance of students across all demographics is in decline. Math scores are plummeting and A-G completion rates are poor compared to other districts in south orange county. CUSD is no longer “the highest achieving large school district in the State”.

CUSD has shifted priorities away from what is in the educational interest of students, to what is in the financial interests of employees. This will be the 5th consecutive year of across the board compensation increases for employees totaling over $120 million dollars in a district that cannot afford to fund a minimum curriculum.

 

June 7, 2017 Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda Item #1 PUBLIC HEARING 2017-18 Local Control Accountability Plan

and 

June 7, 2017 Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda Item #26 2017-18 Local Control Accountability Plan Information/Discussion

The 2016-17 LCAP will be voted on at the June 28, 2017 BOT Meeting.

June 7, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda page 1: PUBLIC HEARING LCAP 

Board Audio at 27 minutes 40 Seconds: 

BLUE CARD Dawn Urbanek

Test Scores

CUSD failed to meet it's stated goal of increasing test scores by 3% on the SBAC (ELA and Math) and Star Test Life Science with the following single exception:

SBAC Math for those who exceeded the standard increased by 4%.

All other measures failed to meet the stated Goal.

Class Room Instruction will reflect grade level standards

CUSD no longer provides district funded Art- Music - Science. Parents fundraise for these core educational classes. As such CUSD cannot state with certainty that all students have access to instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks taught by a appropriately credentialed teacher. A class that is funded by the PTA and taught by a parent does not meet these standards. CUSD needs to change it's LCAP to accurately reflect the conditions of learning at CUSD. CUSD's reliance on fundraising and donations (one time money) to pay for core educational classes (on-going expenses) creates wealth based inequities within the district that illegal. 

Increase Teachers appropriately credentialed by 1%

CUSD does not count parent volunteers who are teaching classes - for example Cre8 Art Program at Lobo Elementary School- a PTA funded program taught by parents.

Maintain 100% student access to standards-aligned instructional materials

There is no equity across the district when parents are fundraising for art, music and science classes - all different programs - different materials and different types of instructors. 

Expulsions and suspensions have actually increased.

CUSD met the attendance Goals.

A- G Completion Rates

A - G Completion Rates are not accurate. CUSD published the results in a manner that was intended to make charter schools look bad. CUSD only has high school charters that are alternative schools. This was done to make really great K-8 Charter Schools look bad.

High School Graduation Rates

CUSD has a passage rate of a D when most Districts have a passage rate of a C.

 

PUBLIC HEARING CLOSED at 8:01

AGENDA ITEM #26 is the same 2017-18 LCAP Plan Information & Discussion

June 7, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #26 page 3872017-18 LCAP Plan 

Board Audio at 76 minutes 40 Seconds: Dr Susan Holiday

Dr Susan Holiday presented this item and stated that the Board is required to approve this plan - a new rule that started this year. On May 24, 2017 CUSD presented a brief overview of the LCAP. CUSD had 18 stakeholder engagement sessions that took place with a wide variety of stakeholders. 

NEW! Districts must include their entire General Fund Budget in the plan for greater transparency. 

Many of the metrics are required. ie High School drop out data is required.

CUSD received constructive feedback from the Public Hearing and would like to suggest replacing the following language regarding special education referrals:

Staff is recommending that CUSD change this goal from "Decrease special education identification" to "Increase participation in pre-referral interventions prior to identifying students for special education programs".

OCDE gives CUSD very high accolades on the District's LCAP.

The LCAP must be approved by June 30, 2017

Board Audio at 80 minutes 45 seconds

BLUE CARD Dawn Urbanek

The LCAP is the public's only transparency tool. Here is an example of why it is not a very effective tool.

Goal 3 - Facilities "Standards for Facilities "Good Repair" will be met.

CUSD hires Facility Inspection Services Incorporated to do FIT Inspections for all CUSD schools at a cost of $50,000 per year. They are always marked "Good". This is what goes on each schools SARC Report.

Ambuehl Elementary School SARC Report is marked "Good"

However, in an effort to get the Public to pass a new school facilities bond, CUSD hired Kitchell to do a needs assessment on Ambuehl Elementary School.

The Kitchell Study found that Ambuehl has facilities that violate the Williams Settlement.

The legislation implementing the Williams settlement requires that every school district provide a uniform complaint process for complaints regarding insufficient instructional materials, unsafe or unhealthy facility conditions, and teacher vacancies and mis-assignments.

Kitchell found several unsafe/unhealthy facilities conditions that under the Williams settlement agreement would require that CUSD fix these issues immediately, or the State of California would not mandate that students attend Ambuehl Elementary School because the facilities are unsafe or unhealthy.

The Kitchell study found the following which would violate the Williams settlement agreement and gave the school a rating of POOR:

• General Buildings: Life safety, ADA, inadequate restroom quantity

• Mechanical Systems: Poor condition, end of useful life, rust, corrosion. Two 
units inoperable

• Plumbing Systems: Inoperable water heater, water fountains, calcium build up

• Electrical Systems: Switchgear & panels past useful life, lamp replacement
difficult, added receptacles required

• Fire Alarm Systems: Panel in poor condition

• Fire Sprinkler Systems: No fire sprinkler in main building

The Associated Costs of Immediate (Williams Complaint) Repairs: $990,954.00

The Kitcheel study showed that Ambuehl needs $8.4 million in total repairs. $1 million is needed to fix health and safety violations.

CUSD tried (but failed) to pass Measure M in 2016. Those bond documents stated that Ambuehl needed $14.6 million in repairs. Measure M failed because the Public does not believe or trust CUSD. CUSD's priority is not the education of children, it is adult jobs and employee compensation. 

CUSD has given employees across the board compensation increases for the last four consecutive years totaling over $120 million dollars while forcing students and staff to attend schools that are "unsafe" and "unhealthy". 

Full Documentation can be found at CUSDWatch May 24, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #34 District wide Facilities Condition Assessment Services. 

 

Trustee Comments:

Board Audio at 83 minutes 40 Seconds: Trustee Jones

Trustee Jones asked staff about the lower graduation rates and was told that the lower rates were in ELL, Students with Disabilities, and African Americans. She asked staff to list those groups specifically in the LCAP rather than just the total number to make CUSD look better by explaining the decrease.

Here is the Data Trustee Jones was asking for clarification on: 

ELL: ELL Actually increased - Staff?

2014-15: 89%

2015-16 91.7%

Increase 2.7% 

Students with Disabilities: Actually increased - Staff?

2014-15: 79.8%

2015-16 80.6% 

Increase .08% 

The big decline was Foster Youth. Staff did not mention this group. And it should be noted that staff cut their Foster Youth budget in half.

Foster Youth

2014-15: 84.6%

2015-16 71.4%

Decrease 13.2%

Source: Data Quest 2014-15 Outcome by Program

Source: Data Quest 2015-16 Outcome by Program

 

Graduation Rates by Race:

Source: Data Quest 2014-15 District Enrollment by Ethnicity & Grade 

Source: Data Quest 2015-16 District Enrollment by Ethnicity & Grade

Source: Data Quest 2016-17 District Enrollment by Ethnicity & Grade

Source: Data Quest 2014-15 Graduates by Ethnicity

Source: Data Quest 2015-16 Graduates by Ethnicity 

Source: Data Quest 2016-17 Graduates by Ethnicity - Data not available Yet

Pacific Islander

2014-15 88.9% (Enrolled 9 students -  8 graduated)

2015-16 100% (Enrolled 6 students - 6 graduated)

Increase 11.1%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

2014-15 94.4% (Enrolled 18 students -  17 graduated)

2015-16 100% (Enrolled 20 students - 20 graduated)

Increase 5.6% 

Filipino

2014-15 96.8% (Enrolled 93 students - 90 graduated)

2015-16 100% (Enrolled 74 students - 74 graduated)

Increase 3.2%

Asian

2014-15 100% (Enrolled 228 students - 228 graduated) 

2015-16 97.6% (Enrolled Enrolled 249 students - 243 graduated)

Increase 2.4% 

The Decrease by ethnicity was in your largest enrollment groups Whites and Hispanic/Latino. The largest percentage decline was in Not Reported 6.83%

White

2014-15 97.6% (Enrolled 2,753 students - 2,687 graduated)

2015-16 96.5% (Enrolled 2,625 students - 2,533 graduated)

Decrease 1.1%

Two or More Races

2014-15 95.13% (Enrolled 226 students - 215 graduated)

2015-16 94.1% (Enrolled 267 students - 251 graduated) 

Decrease 1.03%

Hispanic Latino

2014-15 94.9% (Enrolled 978 students -  928 graduated)

2015-16 92.9% (Enrolled 1094 students - 1016 graduated) 

Decrease 2% 

African American

2014-15 86.44% (Enrolled 59 students -  51 graduated)

2015-16 80% (Enrolled 65 students - 52)

Decrease 6.44%

Not Reported

2014-15 83.33% (Enrolled 6 students - 5 graduated)

2015-16 76.5% (Enrolled 17 students - 13 graduated)

Decrease 6.83%

 

Board Audio at 84 minutes 40 Seconds: Trustee Jones

Is CUSD required to give percentages for increase and decrease. Should CUSD change the LCAP Goals from "increase by 3%" to just "increase". If CUSD's goals just say increase or decrease CUSD will appear to meet more of their goals. 

Board Audio at 85 minutes 12 seconds: Trustee Jones

The only Williams Act Schools we have are Kinoshita and Viejo correct?

Staff verified that statement and said no other schools are covered by Williams Act.

Note: 

This comment was very misleading- Uniform complaints under the Williams Settlement agreement can be filed at anytime on behalf of any school.

Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cp/uc/

Williams Complaints

A Williams Complaint, another type of UCP complaint, regards instructional materials, emergency or urgent facilities conditions that pose a threat to the health and safety of pupils, and teacher vacancy or mis-assignment and may be filed anonymously. Williams Complaints are filed with the principal, or their designee, of the school in which the complaint arises. Schools have complaint forms available for these types of complaints, but will not reject a complaint if the form is not used as long as the complaint is submitted in writing.

A complaint should be filed on behalf of Ambuhel given the report findings by Kitchell.

General Buildings: Life safety, ADA, inadequate restroom quantity  

Mechanical Systems: Poor condition, end of useful life, rust, corrosion. Two units inoperable 

Plumbing Systems: Inoperable water heater, water fountains, calcium build up 

Electrical Systems: Switchgear & panels past useful life, lamp replacement difficult, added receptacles required

Fire Alarm Systems: Panel in poor condition

Fire Sprinkler Systems: No fire sprinkler in main building 

THESE ARE VIOLATIONS OF THE WILLIAMS SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

Estimated Repair Costs: $8,432,518 

Immediate $990,954

Critical $2,822,094

Impending $1,081,514

Necessary $227,877

Discretionary $4,859,235

* Also Note that the SARC states that Ambuehl Facilities have a "Good" rating.  

*Also Note that CUSD inflated its Measure M Bond needs. In those documents CUSD said Ambuehl needed $14 million in repairs. 

There was no further discussion of the LCAP. Staff did not go through any of the data reports or individual test scores.

 

2016-17 LCAP ANNUAL REVIEW

Material Errors Should Be Corrected Prior To Board Approval.

 

GOAL 1

Engage students in meaningful, challenging, and innovative educational experiences to increase post-secondary options for all students.

25 Measurable Outcomes

19 Actions

$1.3 Million Over Budget

$1.1 million Employee Compensation/Professional Development

$49 thousand CAPO Forward - NEW! Not in original LCAP

$10 thousand GATE - NEW! Not in original LCAP

 

$131,202.00 Reductions:

Action 2 - Books and Supplies: $9,901 

Action 9 - Medi-Cal Certificated Employees $3,000

Action 11 - MTS Supplies $5,000 - Dibbles Printing $3,100

Action 13 - Tutoring for Forster Children $3,000

Action 15 - Professional Development $71,878

Action 16 - Compensation $27,154 - Naviance $69

Action 17 - Compensation $100 - Professional Development $8,000

 

CUSD MET 4 of its stated Goals:

Measurable Outcome 15 - Maintain District attendance rate of 96% or higher 

Measurable Outcome 18 - Increase HS graduation rate

Measurable Outcome 20 - Continued expansion of CTE pathways to reflect high wage/high demand industries/careers

Measurable Outcome 23 - Increase number of Advanced Placement course test takers

 

CUSD DID NOT MEET 13 of its stated Goals:

Measurable Outcome 1 - Increased student proficiency in academic achievement measures (including SBA) by State growth targets or by 3% in all grade bands and subgroups.

Measurable Outcome 2 - Classroom instruction will reflect grade level standards, including integrated digital literacy skills as measured by Bright Bytes.

Measurable Outcome 3 - Increased reclassification rate by 3% over previous year.

Measurable Outcome 5 - AMAO 1: Meet target AMAO 2: Meet target and increase by 3% 

Measurable Outcome 12 - Decreased referrals for more restricted programs

Measurable Outcome 14 - Decreased special education identification

Measurable Outcome 16 - Reduce chronic absenteeism rate by .4%

Measurable Outcome 17 - Increase the number of students completing a-g by 3% from previous year 

Measurable Outcome 19 - Decrease MS and HS dropout rate 

Measurable Outcome 21 - EAP results will reflect a 3% increase or identified State target overthe prior year in students identified as "college ready"

Measurable Outcome 22 - Increase Advanced Placement pass rate with 3 or higher by 3% 

Measurable Outcome 24 - Annual Tech. Plan objectives will be met.

Measurable Outcome 25 - Classroom 1:1 device program will be expanded.

 

Mixed Success

Measurable Outcome 6 - Increase teachers appropriately credentialed and assigned by 1%

Measurable Outcome #7 - Maintain 100% student access to standards-aligned instructional materials 

 

5 GOALS were Baseline Data Collection - or No Measurement

Measurable Outcome 4 - Number of LTEL students will decrease by 2% over previous year in Grades 5-12

Measurable Outcome 8 - Systematic approach for identifying at-risk students 

Measurable Outcome 9 - Appropriate interventions to meet the needs of at-risk students

Measurable Outcome 10 - Universal screening data will be gathered on an ongoing basis at all sites  

Measurable Outcome 11 - Counseling support will be available for sites

 

Data was not available for 1 Goal

Measurable Outcome 13 - Decreased suspensions and expulsions 

 

Measurable Outcome 1 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Increased student proficiency in academic achievement measures (including SBA) by State growth targets or by 3% in all grade bands and subgroups.

Source: http://caaspp.cde.ca.gov/

Smarter Balanced Assessment

English Language Arts

Goal Increase performance in ELA by 3%  

Source: CAASPP

 

Standard Exceeded: GOAL NOT MET

2015 33% 

2016 35%

Increase 2%

 

Standard Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 36%

2016 34%

Decrease 2% 

 

69% of ALL Students are Meeting or Exceeding Standard 

 

Standard Nearly Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 18% 

2016 17% 

Decrease 1% 

Standard Not Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 14%

2016 14%

No Change

 

31% of ALL Students are NOT Meeting the Standard

 

 

Smarter Balanced Assessment

Math

Goal Increase Performance in Math by 3%

Source: CAASPP

 

Standard Exceeded: GOAL MET

2015 28% 

2016 32%

Increase 4%

 

Standard Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 28%

2016 27%

Decrease 1% 

 

59% of ALL Students are Meeting or Exceeding Standard 

 

Standard Nearly Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 25% 

2016 23% 

Decrease 2% 

 

Standard Not Met: GOAL NOT MET

2015 19%

2016 18%

Decrease 1%

 

41% of ALL Students are NOT Meeting the Standard

 

 

Socio-Economially Disadvantaged

English Language Arts

2015: 39%

2016: 40%

Increase 1%

Math

2015: 27%

2016: 28%

Increase 1%

English Learners

English Language Arts

2015: 10%

2016: 10%

No Change

Math

2015: 10%

2016: 11%

Increase 1%

Students with Disabilities

 
 

English Language Arts

2015: 29%

2016: 29%

No Change

 

Math

2015: 22%

2016: 24%

Increase 2%

 

California Star Test Science

 
Goal is to increase performance by 3%

Grade 5

Advanced:

2015 37%

2016 37% 

No Change

 

Proficient:

2015 41%

2016 42% 

Increase 1%

 

Basic:

2015 16%

2016 15% 

Decrease 1%

 

Below:

2015 4%

2016 3% 

Decrease 1%

 

Far Below:

2015 2%

2016 2% 

No Change

 

Grade 8

 

Advanced:

2015 69%

2016 67% 

Decrease 2%

Proficient:

2015 17%

2016 17% 

No Change

Basic:

2015 8%

2016 10% 

Increase 2%

   Below Basic:

2015 3%

2016 3% 

No Change

   Far Below:

2015 2%

2016 2% 

No Change

Grade 10

   Advanced:

2015 48%

2016 47% 

Decrease 1% 

   Proficient:

2015 30%

2016 29% 

Decrease 1% 

 Basic:

2015 16%

2016 16% 

No Change

 Below Basic:

2015 4%

2016 4% 

No Change

 Far Below:

2015 3%

2016 3% 

No Change 

 

 

Measurable Outcome 2 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Classroom instruction will reflect grade level standards, including integrated digital literacy skills as measured by Bright Bytes.

 

All students had access to standards-aligned instructional materials.

Students reported increased technology skills and frequency of learning and use of digital literacy skills.

89% of students reported the use of computers in the classroom at least weekly.

CUSD no longer provides District funded Art- Music - Science. Parents fundraise for these core educational classes. As such CUSD cannot state with certainty that all students have access to instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks taught by a appropriately credentialed teacher. CUSD needs to change it's LCAP to accurately reflect the conditions of learning at CUSD. CUSD's reliance on fundraising and donations (one time money) to pay for core educational classes (on-going expenses) creates wealth based inequities within the District that are not legal. 

BrightBytes is a San Francisco-based data analytics company that takes the latest research and data from schools, and examines how teachers and students access and use technology in the classroom, distilling that information into actionable guidance that links tech adoption to changes in learning outcomes. In short, BrightBytes helps districts and administrators decide how and where they should be spending money allocated to education technology.

Contract: May 25, 2016 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #22 page 200

Approval of the Service Agreement with BrightBytes, Inc. for the purposes of gathering data from parents, students and teachers regarding digital literacy. The initial contract term is from June 30, 2016 through June 30, 2017. Annual expenditures under this contract are limited to $75,103.77 funded by the general fund.

Evidence of Data Mining- see BrightBytes Survey that CUSD asked families to take. The survey provided no educational value to students, but provided Bright Bytes with personally identifiable data on device usage at work and home. Did CUSD get paid for this data?: CUSD Bright Bytes Survey

 

  

Measurable Outcome 3 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Increased reclassification rate by 3% over previous year.

"Reclassification Rates" refers to the number of students reclassified from English Language Learner to Fluent in English.

 

Goal Increase Reclassification rates by 3% 

2014-15 11.8%

2015-16 13.4%

Increase 1.6%

Source: Data Quest

 

 

Measurable Outcome 4 - OUTCOME NOT MET  

Number of LTEL students will decrease by 2% over previous year in Grades 5-12 

LTEL stands for Long Term English Learners. If the LCAP is written for parents and the Public as a transparency tool, the use of acronyms in communications with the Public needs to stop.

BASE

LINE

DATA

COLLECTION

 

2015-2016 which the State used a different calculation of students who were English learners six or more years and one of the following:

(1) same proficiency level for two years; or

(2) regressed or "not met" on the Smarter Balanced Assessment (SBA). Therefore, LTEL percentage rates cannot be compared from 2014-2015 to 2015-2016. 2015-2016 will be the new baseline.

Source: Data Quest

 

 

Measurable Outcome 5 - OUTCOME NOT MET  

AMAO 1: Meet target AMAO 2: Meet target and increase by 3% 


 

AMAO 1 - Percentage of EL's Making Annual Progress in learning English

2014-2015: 60.3% 

2015-2016: 59.3%

Decrease 1%

 

   

AMAO 2 - Percentage of EL's attaining English Proficient Level on CELDT will increase 3%

Less than 5 years

2014-15:  26.7%

2015-2016: 29.6%

Increase 2.9%

   

AMAO 2 - Percentage of EL's attaining English Proficient Level on CELDT will increase 3%

Five years or more

2014-2015: 52.7%

2015-2016: 48.8%

Decrease 3.9%

 

 

Measurable Outcome 6 - OUTCOME NOT MET  

Increase teachers appropriately credentialed and assigned by 1%


Is CUSD Really Meeting this Goal?

 

96.25% of teachers were appropriately assigned and credentialed in 2015-2016.

99.21% of teachers were appropriately credentialed and assigned in 2016-2017.

Increase 2.96% GOAL WAS MET

CUSD no longer provides District funded Art- Music - Science Parents fundraise for these core educational subjects. As such CUSD cannot state with certainty that ALL students have access to instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks taught by a properly credentialed teacher.

One Example- CRE8 Art paid for by PTA and taught by Parent Volunteers - Not a credentialed art teacher as required by ED Code. 

CUSD needs to change it's LCAP to accurately reflect the conditions of learning at CUSD.



 

 

Measurable Outcome 7 - OUTCOME NOT MET  

Maintain 100% student access to standards-aligned instructional materials


Is CUSD Really Meeting this Goal?

 

CUSD no longer provides District funded Art- Music - Science Parents fundraise for these core educational subjects. As such CUSD cannot state with certainty that ALL students have access to instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks taught by a properly credentialed teacher.

CUSD needs to change it's LCAP to accurately reflect the conditions of learning at CUSD.

CUSD's reliance on fundraising and donations to pay for core educational classes creates wealth based inequities that are not legal.

 

 

Measurable Outcome 8 

Systematic approach for identifying at-risk students


NO

MEASUREMENT

 

In elementary, DIBELS (universal screening tool) is used to identify students in need of supplemental reading intervention.

The Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) are a set of procedures and measures for assessing the acquisition of early literacy skills from kindergarten through sixth grade. They are designed to be short (one minute) fluency measures used to regularly monitor the development of early literacy and early reading skills.

DIBELS are comprised of seven measures to function as indicators of phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, accuracy and fluency with connected text, reading comprehension, and vocabulary. DIBELS were designed for use in identifying children experiencing difficulty in acquisition of basic early literacy skills in order to provide support early and prevent the occurrence of later reading difficulties.

CUSD cut spending on Dibels by half.

 

 

Measurable Outcome 9  

Appropriate interventions to meet the needs of at-risk students

In elementary, the Passport intervention curriculum is implemented in grades 1-5.

Voyager Passport intervenes early to accelerate learning for students who need supplemental instruction to master priority reading skills and strategies.

This blended solution includes:

Targeted instruction in word study, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, writing, listening, and speaking

Differentiation for diverse student populations, including English language learners

Integrated progress monitoring, reteaching procedures, correction support, and online data management

Online reading practice through Ticket to Read interactive, rewards-based learning

Online reading practice through Ticket to Read interactive, rewards-based learning

Source: http://www.voyagersopris.com/curriculum/subject/literacy/voyager-passport/overview

 

 

Measurable Outcome 10  

Universal screening data will be gathered on an ongoing basis at all sites

For most students, baseline data is gathered at the beginning of the year and students are progress monitored at the middle and end of the year. 

NO 

MEASUREMENT

 

CUSD's LCAP does not state how data is gathered.

Why does CUSD have so many Student Data Management Systems?

Eagle Software (Aeries)
BrightBytes
Cambium Learning Group
Catapult Learning
Edupoint
Follett Aspen Student Information Systems
Illuminate Education
Naviance
Solution Tree
Performance Matters
Renaissance Learning
School Loop

 

Is CUSD is raising revenue from the collection and sale of student data?

 
 
When you click on the link:
 
Through such means as an Interview, Survey/Questionnaire, Test, Instrument or Other. So now we are taking up instructional time with tests and surveys so that third party for profit companies can collect student and family data?
 

 

PUBLIC RECORDS REQUEST IS NEEDED:

How many of these research applications have been approved and how much has CUSD been paid for this research?
 
As a result of this loophole- CUSD has found opportunities to profit from student data mining. The following are two examples:

Federal Money under the Obama Administration

Stimulus Money was used to conduct educational research studies - $4.8 billion -

CUSD received $22.4 million.

InnovateEd; Trustee Hatton-Hodson's company, benefited from the collection of the data as a "sub-vendor". 
 
 
 
 
If you look at the list of vendors - CUSD has paid relationships with most. The Vendors are listed after the recipients so scroll down.
 
  

Hobsons California Readiness Block Grants

BIG RED FLAG

Capistrano Unified and Capistrano Connections Academy are on the list of recipients of this grant money. How did CUSD get this grant? To qualify a high school has to have 75% of students who are Low Income or ELL.
 
9.5% of CUSD students are ELL. Source: DataQuest
 
22.31% (11,962 Socio-economically disadvantaged students out of total enrollment 53,613) DataQuest
 
 
The criteria is: 
 
 
"High schools are eligible for this grant if they have at least 75 percent of students who are low-income or learning English as a second language. In our one-hour webinar on September 20, a panel of experts and educators will discuss grant details including:

• College readiness indicators and how they will be measured
• The formula for determining grant recipients
• How the grants will dovetail with current accountability plans
• Ways schools and school districts can prepare for the grant application process
• How college readiness fits into the current K-12 framework
• Possible college readiness implications at the national level"
 
 
CUSD received $619,868 in  2016-17
 
 
 
 
Retired Trustee Hatton-Hodson left the Board early to move to Northern California where her company InnovateEd will now be providing workshops to teach Districts how to use their LCAP’s to enhance student learning, provide greater parent and community engagement and transparency. InnovateEd will profit greatly from the data they collected on CUSD students and their families.
 
CUSD will begin a new phase of the study by adding a new “Local" Dashboard which will begin social and emotional testing of CUSD students. The data collected under this study will begin in kindergarten with the Kindergarten Readiness Surveys and through personality testing through Naviance Family at different grade levels. The collection of personally identifiable social and emotional data begins to be within the medical area (HIPPA), and the collection and sale of such data is a violation of the privacy rights of every CUSD student and their families.
 
CUSD is forcing students to participate by embedding Naviance Family into classes that are required for graduation which effectively means Parents who are concerned about their family privacy have NO ABILITY TO OPT OUT of data collection. 
 
Trustee Hatton-Hodson greatly influenced curriculum choices at CUSD, and has put the interest of her company and it's partners (LCAPca and Systems Leadership Collaborative and their research above the academic interest of students). 
 
CUSD’s $10,000 payment to ACSA Education Foundation for CUSD's participation in Systems Leadership Collaborative last August is the basis for the on-going Conflict of Interest case against Trustee Hatton-Hodson. 
 
It is CUSD's contracts for data-mining that is the real reason CUSD Trustees have voted to continue CCP/Health as a graduation requirement for one more year stating that even if they wanted to eliminate CCP/Health as a graduation requirement for 2017-18 they could not.
 
I placed the elimination of CCP/Stand Alone Health on the June 7, 2017 BOT meeting as a Citizen's Request. I did so specifically to have this discussion after Trustee Hatton-Hodson had left the Board. Staff granted my request and then immediately scheduled a vote to continue CCP/Health for an additional year essentially rendering my Citizens request meaningless. 
 
The full Presentation can be viewed at: June 7, 2017 BOT meeting Agenda Item #23 page 324 
 

 

Measurable Outcome 11  

Counseling support will be available for sites

NO 

MEASUREMENT

 

School counselors provided social emotional, academic, and college and career counseling support at elementary, middle, and high schools 

CUSD is placing an emphasis on counselors because they want to start collecting social/emotional data on all students through Naviance Family.

 

 

Measurable Outcome 12 - OUTCOME NOT MET  

Decreased referrals for more restricted programs (aka special education)

 

Special Education Referrals:

2014-2015: 1,358

2015-2016: 1,451

Increase 93 students

 

 

Measurable Outcome 13 - DATA NOT RELEASED YET FOR 2016-17  

Decreased suspensions and expulsions

2015-16

Data 

Not 

Released Yet

 

Suspension Rate:

Source: Data Quest

2013-14 1,135 Students Suspended 2%

2014-15 1,049 Students Suspended 1.9%

2015-16 Data not out yet

Expulsion Rate

2013-14 50 Students <.1%

2014-15 29 Students <.1%

2015-16 Data not out yet

2014-15 Total Offenses Committed Main Reasons for Expulsions are:

48900(c) Possession, Use, Sale, or Furnishing a Controlled Substance, Alcohol, Intoxicant - 19 Cases

48900(h) Possession or Use of Tobacco Products - 4 Cases

48900(j) Offering Arranging or Negotiating Sale of Drug Paraphernalia - 3 Cases

48915(c) Sale of a controlled substance - 3 Cases
Main Reasons for Suspensions are:

48900(k) Disruption / Defiance - 559 Cases

48900(a)(1) Caused, Attempted or Threatened Physical Injury - 275 Cases

48900(c) Possession, Use, Sale, or Furnishing a Controlled Substance, Alcohol, Intoxicant - 198 Cases

48900(h) Possession or Use of Tobacco Products - 133 Cases

 

 

Measurable Outcome 14 - OUTCOME NOT MET 

Decreased special education identification

In 2013-2014, 594 students qualified for special education services. In 2014-2015, 647 students qualified for special education services. In 2015-2016, 926 students qualified for special education services which is an increase of 279 students.

 

Students qualified for special education services

2013-2014: 594

2014-2015: 647 an increase of 53 students

2015-2016: 926  an increase of 279 students.

Board Audio at 79:23

Staff is recommending that CUSD change this goal to state: "Replace it with Increase participation in pre-referral interventions" prior to placing students into special education programs. 

 

 

Measurable Outcome 15 - OUTCOME MET

Maintain District attendance rate of 96% or higher

Attendance rate for 2014-2015 was 96.06%. In 2015-2016 it was 96.00%. Maintaining a 96% attendance rate was met.

 

Attendance:

2014-2015: 96.06%

2015-2016: 96.00%

Decline .06% 

Goal Met but attendance rate declined

 

 

Measurable Outcome 16 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Reduce chronic absenteeism rate by .4%

Chronic absenteeism rate in 2014-2015 was 9.95%. In 2015-2016 it was 9.77%. Chronic attendance was reduced by .18%. The goal of reducing it by .4% was not met

 

Absenteeism

2014-2015 9.95%

2015-2016 9.77%

Decrease of .18% GOAL NOT MET but Chronic attendance was reduced by .18%

 

  

Measurable Outcome 17 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Increase the number of students completing A-G by 3% from previous year 

CUSD's A-G completion rate ALL SCHOOLS

2014-2015 54.4% 

2015-2016 54.4% 

No Change 

This means that :

54.4% of CUSD's graduating students will have the option to attend a 4-year college after graduation.

45.6% have NO OPTION but Community College or a job after graduation.  

CUSD's A-G completion rate (without charter schools)

2014-2015 57.3%  

2015-2016 57.5%

Increase .2%

The goal to increase by 3% was not met.

CUSD is making it look like Charter Schools are pulling down A-G completion rates.

How does CUSD compare to other local Districts:

Irvine 66.8%

Laguna Beach 70.6%

Newport Mesa 59.8%

Saddleback 51.2%

 

This data is presented in such a way as to make Charter School look like they are underperforming.

Excluding Charter Schools

2014-2015 57.3% (This number is incorrect)

2015-2016 57.5% (This number is incorrect)

A-G Completion Rates increased by .2%. 

Charter Schools: This is the total for the District including Charters not the number for just Charters

2014-2015 54.4% (This is the number for ALL High Schools)

2015-2016 54.4% (This is the number for ALL High Schools)

A-G Completion Rates No Change. 

Correct Data per Data Quest 2015-16

Correct Data per Data Quest 2014-15

Traditional High Schools:

A-G 59.37%

40% of all students have no option but to attend Community College or work after graduating High School. They are not qualified to enter a 4- year college. 

Charter Schools A-G 11.7% 

8.4% Capistrano Connections Academy Charter (K-12)

15% Opportunities for Learning (7-12) 

Not included in A-G

0 % Community Roots Academy (K-8 - No a-g rate)

Journey Charter School (K-8 - No a-g rate)

Oxford Preparatory Academy Charter School (TK-8 No a-g rate)

District Total (all schools, including Charters is 54.4%) 

 

TRADITIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS

 

 

Aliso Niguel High School

2014-15 58%

2015-16 58%

No Change

   

Capistrano Valley High School

2014-15 67.8%

2015-16 59.8%

Decrease 8%

   

Dana Hills High School

2014-15 65.3%

2015-16 57.2%

Decrease 8.1%

   

San Clemente High School

2014-15 64.8%

2015-16 59.5%

Decrease 5.3%

     

San Juan Hills High School

2014-15 68.9%

2015-16 58.8%

Decrease 10.1%

   

Tesoro High School

2014-15 62.4%

2015-16 62.9%

Increase .5%

 

ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOLS

 

NO

CHANGE

 

Bridges Community Day

2014-15 0%

2015-16 0%

No Change

   

California Prep

2014-15 39.6%

2015-16 37.8%

Decline 1.8%

 

 

Junipero Serra High School

2014-15 0%

2015-16 0%

No Change

 

CHARTER HIGH SCHOOLS 

   

Capistrano Connections Academy Charter

2014-15 8.4%

2015-16 16.3%

Increase 7.9%

     

Opportunities for Learning

2014-15 0%

2015-16 15%

Increase 15%

 

District Staff attempted to present the data is such a way that made it look like Charter Schools were pulling the A-G Completion rates down. That is very misleading. CUSD has two alternative Charter High Schools - no traditional Charter High Schools. Traditional Charters score very high.

Not included in A-G completion Rates:

Journey Charter School K-8

Oxford Prep TK - 8

 

 

Measurable Outcome 18 - OUTCOME MET

Increase HS graduation rate

Chronic absenteeism rate in 2014-2015 was 9.95%. In 2015-2016 it was 9.77%. Chronic attendance was reduced by .18%. The goal of reducing it by .4% was not met

 

High School Graduation Rate

2014-15: 96.6%

2015-16: 97.1%

Increase .5%

 

 

Measurable Outcome 19 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Decrease MS and HS dropout rate 

2014-2015, there were two students reported as middle school dropouts. In 6 of 87 2015-2016, there were five students reported as middle school drop outs. In 2014- 2015, the high school drop out rate was 1.4% and in 2015-2016, the rate was the same at 1.4%. The goal of decreasing the middle and high school drop out rate was not met

 

Drop Out Rates as Reported on the LCAP are incorrect.

Middle School Dropouts

2014-15 2 students 

2015-16 5 students (Error should be 9 students)

High School Dropouts

2014-15 1.4% (Error - this is the County Rate CUSD is .7%)

2015-16 1.4% (Error - this is the County Rate CUSD is .7%) 

Correct Data Per Data Quest

Source: 2014-15 

Source: 2015-16

Middle School Dropouts

2014-15 2 students

2015-16 9 students

Increase of 7 students

High School Dropouts

2014-15 118

2015-16 133

Increase of 15 students

 

 

Measurable Outcome 20 - OUTCOME MET

Continued expansion of CTE pathways to reflect high wage/high demand industries/careers

In 2016-2017, five (Energy & Power, Food Science & Hospitality, Animal Science, Product Innovation & Design, Networking) CTE pathways were added for a total of 28 pathways. In 2015-2016, there were 7,892 (48%) high school students participating in CTE pathways. In 2016-2017, there were 10,595 (62%) high school students participating in CTE pathways. The goal to increase pathways was met.

 

CTE Pathways

2015-16: 7,892 (48%) high school students participated in CTE pathways.

2016-17: 10,595 (62%) high school students participated in CTE pathways.

In 2016-2017, CUSD added five new pathways:

Energy & Power,

Food Science & Hospitality,

Animal Science,

Product Innovation & Design,

Networking 

*Note: Encouraging students CTE classes that do not meet A-G requirements may not qualify for a seat at a selective college or University. For example- students that take a CTE in place of a language will not be qualified to go to a 4 year college that does not recognize CTE classes as a replacement for the language requirement.

 

  

Measurable Outcome 21 - OUTCOME NOT MET

EAP results will reflect a 3% increase or identified State target overthe prior year in students identified as "college ready" 

EAP College Ready Rate (Ready by the end of 11th grade - when you have to do well on college entrance exams)

 

Data as reported on LCAP

English Language Arts

2014-2015 41%

2015-16 42%

Increase of 1%

Math

2014-15 22%.

2015-2016 24%

Increase of 2%

The 3% target was not met.

The State target of "Blue" or "Green" has not been calculated by the State yet

 

Actual Data EAP 2014: https://eap2014.ets.org/ViewReport.asp

2014 Ready for college:

English 42%

Algebra II 3% (Needed to get into a 4-year selective college)

Summative High School Math 27%

Total Math 17%

2014 Conditional: 

English 16%

Algebra II 18% (Needed to get into a 4-year selective college)

Summative High School Math 67%

Total Math 48%

"Conditional" means Will need remedial work before entering a 4- year selective college - College Boards must be taken no later than the summer before 12th Grade to gain acceptance that is why they look at readiness at the end of 11th grade.

2014 Not Ready

English 42%

Algebra II 79% 

Summative High School Math 7%

Total Math 35%

Must use Algebra II Results for 4- year selective University - to do well on College Boards a student must know Algebra I - Geometry - Algebra II 

 

Switched to CAASP Testing

Actual Data EAP 2015

Source: 2015 CAASP

2015 English Language Arts 11th Grade

41% Exceeded Standard

34% Met Standard

16% Nearly Met Standard

10% Standard Not Met

75% are ready for college

2015 Math 11th Grade

22% Exceeded Standard

28% Met Standard

23% Nearly Met Standard

27% Standard Not Met

50% are ready for college

Standard Exceeded: Same as "College Ready"

The student has exceeded the achievement standard and demonstrates the knowledge and skills in mathematics needed for likely success in entry-level, credit-bearing college coursework after high school.

Standard Met: Same as "Conditional"

The student has met the achievement standard and demonstrates progress toward mastery of the knowledge and skills in mathematics needed for likely success in entry-level, credit-bearing college coursework after high school.

Actual Data EAP 2016

Source: 2016 CAASP

2015 English Language Arts 11th Grade

41% Exceeded Standard

32% Met Standard

16% Nearly Met Standard

11% Standard Not Met

73% are ready for college Decline 2%

2015 Math 11th Grade

24% Exceeded Standard

27% Met Standard

22% Nearly Met Standard

27% Standard Not Met

51% are ready for college Increase 1%

CUSD is extremely weak in Math and had the weakest graduation requirements 2 years of HighSchool Math the passage of Algebra 1 with a "D"

Beginning with the class of 2020 CUSD is changing the math requirement to 3 years of high school Math completion of Algebra II with a "D" to graduate.

 

75% of CUSD's graduates will have no option after high school except Community College or Career.

 

 

Measurable Outcome 22 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Increase Advanced Placement pass rate with 3 or higher by 3% 

AP pass rate for 2014-2015 was 78.7% and in 2015-2016 was 78.2%. Increase of 3% was not met.

 

AP Pass Rate:

2014-2015: 78.8%

2015-2016: 78.2%

Decrease  .6%

 

 

Measurable Outcome 23 - OUTCOME MET

Increase number of Advanced Placement course test takers

AP pass rate for 2014-2015 was 78.7% and in 2015-2016 was 78.2%. Increase of 3% was not met.

 

Number of students taking at least one AP classes

2014-2015 4,216

2015-2016 4,410

Increase of 194 students

 

 

Measurable Outcome 24 - OUTCOME NOT MET

 Annual Tech. Plan objectives will be met.

90% of technology plan goals were met.

One goal is addressed in number 25 and the student email goal has been postponed until the District moves to a cloud email system for staff.

Staff should have said:

Classroom 1:1 device program was maintained with the dollars utilized for refresh instead of expansion

Student email goal has been postponed until the District moves to a cloud email system for staff

 

CUSD Technology Plan: Google Accounts for all students for use on and off campus

 

 

TECHNOLOGY PLAN LCAP GOAL 1:

Measurable Out Come 1: Prepare students to use digital tools and immerse them in digital literacy

Action Steps:

● Ensure technology integration is a part of CAGs (Curriculum Alignment Guides) and PGs (Pacing Guides) across the curriculum

● Continued SBAC (Smarter Balanced Test) preparation

● Technology Integration Professional Development for Instructional Coaches and Curriculum Specialists

● Summer PDA and/or SAMR-I academy (SAMR is a model of technology integration)

● Google Accounts for all students for use on and off campus

* This should be an OPT IN - not a requirement - students should not be mandated to share personally identifiable information with Google.

● Research possible tablet pilots in K-2 by 2016-17

● Information Literacy - Purposeful development of curriculum on how to search for valid information, cite information, etc. as outlined in the adopted CUSD Digital Literacy for the K-12 Classroom

● Create and implement a K-5 timeline of digital literacy skills as a progression framework to be adapted with Curriculum Specialists

● Digital Citizenship in accordance with CIPA, AB 307, and S 1492

○ Work with MTSS (Multi-tier System of Supports) department to modify Second Step lessons to incorporate digital citizenship aspects to positive behavior lessons.

○ DLTs (Digital Literacy Teachers) in May/June of 2015 will evaluate free online content as well as paid content to create a pacing guide of digital citizenship lessons that must be taught each year for E-Rate compliance.

○ Create a list of items that should be in all digital lessons - things to remember - “highly effective habits of digital teachers” - what do they do every time.

○ Create lessons with curriculum specialists including highly effective habits of digital teachers - what should be mentioned at each lesson involving online research, images, etc.

○ Research and implement accountability measures.

Measurable Out Come 2: Utilize district-wide web-based Electronic Learning Programs (ELPs) that are research-based and provide formative and summative assessment data of student progress across standards.

Action Steps:

● Create guiding questions and a rubric to evaluate all current and future learning programs.

● Create a matrix of learning programs that support learning and MTSS, separate application for purchasing apps.

● Review all current ELPs and decide whether or not to continue support.

● Work with school sites to adopt or transition to approved resources.

● Create a rubric to approve any new programs to be adopted by a technology curriculum committee. Data driven decisions.

● Consider factors such as Special Education, ROP, Adult Education, and ELD (English Language Development) in the adoption of digital programs.

● Ensure MDM (Mobile Device Management) control of student devices for delivering apps.

Measurable Out Come 3: Prepare students for success in college and career

Action Steps:

● Planning for online student portfolios

○ Research Naviance and Google compatibility

○ Ensure 12th grade students can transfer work from Google to a personal account before graduation

Unique to CUSD - they have embedded Naviance Family into CCP and other core educational programs as a requirement for Graduation. Naviance Family engages in personality testing and collects other personally identifiable data on students. CUSD has stated that it intends to add personality testing and social/emotional testing to this. Parents should have the ability to OPT OUT and practically speaking that is not possible when participation in the data collection is required for Graduation.

● Student Email - Introduce High School Email in 2016-1017 and Middle School Email in 2017-2018 if High School program is successful

CUSD postponed student e-mail implementation- GOAL NOT MET

● Expand Chromebook Program

○ 2015-2016 4th grade, 6th-8th Math, 6 additional carts at each High School with equity considerations

○ 2016-2017 Expansion depends on budget available

○ 2017-2018 Replace 2013-2014 Pilot classrooms and be prepared to replace 2014-2015 Chromebooks, plus expansion as deemed prudent depending on available budget

○ Stakeholders were very aware of the need to ensure that saving for grade levels already using Chromebooks to continue the program would take priority over expanding the program to new grade levels.

● Microsoft IT academy - to be offered through Cal Prep 2015-2016

○ Consideration of offering the certificates district-wide through Cal Prep 2016-2017

● ROP - Cisco and Microsoft IT Academy classes will be considered for Certificate programs

● Khan Academy - Javascripting, Differentiated instruction

● ICT Pathways at High Schools

● Hour of Code to be introduced to Elementary teachers through Tech Tuesdays and Digital Literacy

● Continued Professional Development of all teachers in Technology Integration aligned with WIG I

CUSD Teachers are chronically absent:

Measurable Outcome 4: Enable online district-wide common assessments and automate data gathering from assessments for the data dashboard

● Utilizing online assessments to drive instruction and measure strengths and challenges across the standards for differentiated instruction.

● Technology to support data teams and collaboration between teachers and sites in order to advance teaching practices.

Professional Development

● Google Apps for Education

● Discovery Education

● Typing Agent

● SAMR model with specific classroom applications

○ Socratic Seminars, DBQs (Document Based Questions), online collaboration

● Information Literacy

● Digital Citizenship

● Data Dashboard

● Naviance (2017-2018)

● Training for TIS Staff on technical items to support all of the above

CUSD Teachers are chronically absent:

Average Compensation $111,000 for 185 days of service:

Students are in the classroom 180 days

Minus:

5- 8 ACE days

13 Minimum days

10 Days Leave of Absence 

2 Days minimum for Professional Development

If you are a Union Rep - 5 Release days

The average student will have their classroom teacher 160 full days of school and a sub for the other 20. If a student has a union rep as a teacher they get more day with a sub. 

Any absence over 10 days is considered "Chronically Absent".

Full documentation: More than 1 in 4 US teachers are chronically absent

Staffing

● Educational Technology Coordinator position to be added in Road to Recovery II

● Technical staffing ratios to numbers of devices added will be considered

Evaluation

● Brightbytes surveys for data on digital literacy (assess the level of implementation of SAMR and technology integration and innovation)

 

Technology Plan LCAP Goal 2  

Provide interventions for academically, behaviorally and socially/emotionally at risk students.

The District is currently working with a number of current partners and possible future vendor partners to harness the power of data to identify students in need of interventions. TIS will support all departments as vendors are chosen for a data dashboard. Programmers will be
needed to ensure that the data our teachers and administrators need can be found easily and reports can be generated that can help to guide interventions, as well as signal early warnings for needed interventions.

Goal 1: Develop purchased Illuminate data dashboard to integrate assessment, attendance, and other data sets in order to support all students and teachers.

Action Steps:

● The District has selected Illuminate to provide a data dashboard and to create district-wide common assessments for assessment in grades 1-12 in English and Math for fall 2015-2016.

● District-wide Common Assessments will be created for grades 1-12 in Science and History/Social Studies in fall 2016-2017.

Goal 2: Support Special Education and MTSS by increasing collaboration between departments and increased communication between staff members.

Action Steps:

● Increased connection between Special Education and the Educational Technology department through monthly meetings.

● Support collaboration between departments by training on Google Apps.
Staffing

● 2 programmers, 2 data analysts Evaluation

● Monitoring of data integration from multiple sources into the Illuminate data dashboard

● Notes SPED/Ed Tech meetings Professional Development

● Training as needed on data dashboard and assistive technology

● Training of TIS technical staff on Illuminate in order to support classrooms with basics of logging in, running reports.

 

Technology Plan LCAP Goal 3  

Increase the number of K-12 student offerings reflecting a broad course of study for college and career readiness. The goals listed below are adding specifics to items mentioned under LCAP goal 1

Measurable Outcome 1: Consider online and blended learning opportunities for increasing student offerings that are available without travel or across District sites.

Action Steps:

Offer the Microsoft IT Academy certifications through Cal Prep for all Cal Prep students (2015-2016)

Offer the Microsoft IT Academy certifications through Cal Prep for all HS students in the District (2016-2017)

Research other online certifications that are available to students as a purely online model such as Cisco certifications.

Research online courses that could be taught by one teacher at one site to students from multiple sites with similar interests. Build classes using students from multiple sites to justify class existence.

Consider adding Microsoft Office certifications to the CCP courses.

Consider adding web design courses to Middle and/or High School.

Measurable Outcome 2:

Begin with exposure to coding and computer sciences in elementary school in order to expand STEM interest in students and develop college and career ready technical skills.

Action Steps:

Market and emphasize the Hour of Code

Work with Saddleback College to offer coding and game development clubs after school at Elementary and Secondary sites.

Train teachers to use Khan Academy to differentiate instruction including software development and coding.

Increase Offerings at Cal Prep

CTE/ROP Evaluation

Track numbers of Microsoft and other certifications earned by students Training

Offer training on Khan Academy and Hour of Code through Tech Tuesdays and Instructional Coaches at the Elementary level.

 

Technology Plan LCAP Goal 4  

Expand parent and community engagement to include representation of all students

Measurable Out Come Goal 1 Increased parent and student engagement through various technology resources.

Action Steps:

Continue encouraging use of the AERIES Parent Portal to get usage over 90%

Finalize and promote the CUSD Mobile App

Utilize School Messenger and all of the components

Illuminate Data Dashboard reporting for informed conversations with Parents

PTA/Parent involvement in Technology Plan stakeholder committee January, March, April of 2015

Website Upgrades

Site responsibility for website management

School Loop/LMS - RFP for Learning Management System in 2015/2016

Evaluation:

Track usage of parent portal (by site, class, etc) and downloads of CUSD mobile app

Training:

Offer inter-departmental training on School Messenger Train on new LMS (Learning Management System) after adoption

 

Technology Plan LCAP Goal 5

Develop a multi-year plan to enhance facilities that are clean, safe, healthy, functional, and appropriate to foster academic achievement. Increase the number of student and staff technological devices required to support 21st century learning.

Measurable Out Come 1: Increase the Chromebook 1:1 deployment each year while planning for full refresh of Chromebooks from all past years.

Action Steps:

Work with business services to identify funding sources for continued purchase and refresh.

Decide as a District which grade levels and subjects will have 1:1 Chromebook carts based on curricular needs.

Purchase and deploy Chromebooks, licenses, carts, mice, and headphones for all students in identified grade levels.

Wireless infrastructure and APs plus consistent upgrades of wireless infrastructure and bandwidth increases. E-Rate has been written to increase the speed of the bandwidth across the duration of this plan and will add network access points to multiple sites.

Measurable Out Come 2: Replace labs in primary and MS/HS where needed for subject-specific secondary classes.

Action Steps:

Macs only in labs that have mac-specific software requirements that cannot be replicated with a PC or Chrome-based computer

Research and test Chromebox/Chromebase for sites with full Google Apps adoption Goal: Increase adoption of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) at MS and HS, possibly k-3. Action Steps:

BYOD initiatives must be well-planned based on timelines established by the District

Equity devices will be planned and purchased before implementation

Parent surveys and parent information nights will be conducted at sites that implement BYOD

MS/HS - BYOD without instructional change will continue to be allowed at all sites based on site instructional goals

Measurable Out Come 3: Implement Baseline Classroom Technology Standards where possible Action Steps:

Work with sites and facilities to install:

Additional circuits/electrical infrastructure for BYOD

 

 

 

Measurable Outcome 25 - OUTCOME NOT MET

Classroom 1:1 device program will be expanded

 

Classroom 1:1 device program was maintained with the dollars utilized for refresh instead of expansion.

Chromebook Refresh $3,000,000.00  is being used to cover deficit spending Code 9780. 

 

  

Goal 1 Action 1:  MIXED RESULTS

Ensure effective learning conditions through highly qualified staff, reducing class size and providing adequate instructional days for students.

Fully implemented 180 student days. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $638,000. Budgeted $638,000.

ON BUDGET

 

Maintain student days at 180

 

Decreased class size per negotiated agreement. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $1,130,230. Budgeted $1,130,230

ON BUDGET

Decrease class size per negotiated agreement 

* Class sizes are not being reduced. What CUSD should say is that class sizes would have increased AGAIN if they did not spend this money.

 

Provided teacher induction support for first and second year teachers through support providers. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Educator Effectiveness $315,000. Budgeted $315,000.

ON BUDGET

Professional Development for first and second year teachers,

* CUSD spend more on professional development for staff then they do on books and supplies.

 

Goal 1 Action 2: 

Provide professional development for teachers and classified instructional staff on state standards, effective instructional practices, assessment and data analysis

Instructional coaches K-8 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Base $1,268,410

Clerical support 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Title II $86,500

Mileage 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Supplemental $600 Budgeted $500 increase mileage expense by $100.

Sr. Staff Secretary 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $18,808 Budgeted $22,700 compensation increase $3,892.

Data Meetings 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $75,000 Budgeted $75,000.

Instructional Coaches 9-12 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $532,612 Budgeted $400,000 increase compensation $132,612.

NGSS supplies and materials for middle school 4000-4999: Books And Supplies Base $19,079. Budgeted $28,980 decrease money spent on books and supplies.

NGSS professional learning for elementary teachers during ACE days. $0

OVER BUDGET: $123,739.00 

Increased Mileage $100.00

Increased Compensation by: $133,540.00

Decreased Books and Supplies by $9,901.00

 

Provided Professional Learning for teachers and administrators on state standards and effective instructional practices.

Elementary Principals and Instructional Leadership Teams received two days of Professional Learning Communities (PLC) training.

Middle and High School Principals and Instructional Leadership Teams received three days of Professional Learning Communities (PLC) training.

Fully implemented instructional coaches, clerical support, conferences, training, mileage, printing, and other professional development/related activities focused on the State standards and quality instruction

* CUSD spends more on professional development for staff then they do on books and supplies.

 

 

Goal 1 Action 3: 

Ensure state standards-aligned curriculum and materials

Curriculum Specialists (K-5) and (Curriculum Specialists (K-5) and (6-12) 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $752,263. Budgeted $706,104 compensation increase $46,159.

OVER BUDGET: $46,159.00

Increased Compensation by: $46,159.00

 

Fully implemented State standards-aligned curriculum and materials. Curriculum Specialists worked with content teams
to develop curriculum resources, and develop and revise District assessments through horizontal and vertical
articulation.

*Note CUSD does not have District funded Art, Music or Science. CUSD relies on fundraising and donations to pay for these core educational classes. Students who cannot fundraise for these programs do not receive instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks. These classes are parent funded and sometimes even parent taught. Core educational classes, by law must be taught by an appropriately credentialed teacher.

Fund the CORE CURRICULUM for EVERY CHILD before anything else.

 

Goal 1 Action 4: 

Provide Professional Development, technical support, and progress analysis (aka Data Mining) in the area of digital literacy

TIS TOSAs provided professional development and technical support for elementary and secondary digital literacy 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Base $273,599 Budgeted $200,000 increase employee compensation $73,599.

Technical and training support for elementary and secondary re: digital literacy tools 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Base $101,222.Budgeted $80,000. increase employee compensation $21,222.

Bright Bytes 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Base $75,104.Budgeted $62,000 increase $13,104.00.

 

OVER BUDGET: $107,925.00

Increased Compensation by: $94,821

Increased Bright Byte Expense $ 13,104.00

Provided professional learning, technical support, and progress analysis in the area of digital literacy.

TIS TOSAs provided Chromebook and digital literacy training across the District and worked with Curriculum Specialists to incorporate digital literacy into CUSD curriculum.

Training User Support Specialist (TUSS) and Lead TUSS managed Google domain, electronic learning programs, and assisted with the repair of Chromebooks.

Bright Bytes was used for data collection and principal training to access data to guide planning and instruction in digital literacy and digital citizenship and the four C's

 

Goal 1 Action 5: 

Increase number of ELLs who reclassify as fully English proficient by 3%, and decrease the number of LTEL students by 2%.

 

Summer EL Support and CELDT Testing 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $89,097 Budgeted $91,000 Decrease compensation $1,903

Testing Technicians 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $41,378 Budgeted $14,408 Increase compensation $26,970

Secondary ELD sections 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $744,780 Budgeted $420,000 Increase compensation $324,780

OVER BUDGET: $349,847.00

Increased Compensation by: $349,847.00

 

Successfully implemented the 2016 Summer EL support sessions, using testing technicians and providing additional assignment to teachers.

Utilized secondary ELD sections to provide designated ELD.

Reclassification Rates Decrease

2014-15 11.8%

2015-16 13.4%

Increase 1.6%- Goal Not Met

LTEL Data is a baseline for 2015-16

 

Goal 1 Action 6: 

Provide program guidance, professional development, materials and support for teachers and paraprofessionals serving English learners with a focus on ensuring access to state standards and ELD aligned instruction.

ELD Advisors 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Title III $107,141 Budgeted $145,000 Compensation Increase.

OVER BUDGET: $37,859.00

Increased Compensation by: $37,859.00

 

Fully implemented the use of ELD Advisors to support ELD; enhanced the scope and expertise of ELD Advisors through professional learning to build capacity for instructional support of English learner students.

 

Goal 1 Action 7: 

English learner program operations

Director and Coordinator 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $285,831 Budgeted $259,124 compensation increase $26,707.

Staff Secretary 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $70,879 Budgeted $67,272 compensation increase $3,625.

Office Supplies 4000-4999: Books And Supplies Supplemental $18,303 Budgeted $10,000 increase $8,303

Printing 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Supplemental $300 Budgeted $600 down $300.

Account Clerk 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $28,352 Budgeted $25,000 compensation increase $3,352

Bilingual Clerk 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $72,231 Budgeted $68,544 compensation increase $3,687

Bilingual Intermediate Office Assistant 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $63,924 Budgeted $60,725 compensation increase $3,924

Intermediate Office Assistant 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $40,886 Budgeted $40,000 compensation increase $886.

OVER BUDGET: $50,184.00

Compensation Increases $42,181.00

Books & supplies $8,303.00

Printing Decrease $300.00

 

Program operations were fully implemented in order to support program compliance and schools in their efforts to ensure EL students are assessed and receive access to ELD instruction and state standards aligned instruction.

English Language LearnersProficient English Language Arts

2015: 10% proficient 

2016: 10% proficient 

English Language Learners Proficient Math

2015: 10% proficient 

2016: 10% proficient 

*Note CUSD does not have District funded Art, Music or Science. CUSD relies on fundraising and donations to pay for these core educational classes. Students who cannot fundraise for these programs do not receive instruction that aligns with California's Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks. These classes are parent funded and sometimes even parent taught. Core educational classes, by law must be taught by an appropriately credentialed teacher.

Fund the CORE CURRICULUM for EVERY CHILD before anything else.

 

 

 

Goal 1 Action 8: 

Support data-driven decision making to increase student learning.

Data Mining threatens student privacy.

Analyst 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $91,483 Budgeted $86,464 compensation increase $5,019.00.

OVER BUDGET: $5,019.00

Compensation Increases $5,019.00

 

Analyst supported school sites with accessing data to increase ability to adjust instruction and intervene to increase student learning.

CUSD does some things that are unique only to CUSD. CUSD embeds Naviance Family into classes that are required to graduate, which means that students cannot "OPT OUT" of sharing their personally identifiable information. No other District offers CCP as a graduation requirement and no other District forces 100% participation is personality testing. 

 

Goal 1 Action 9: 

Provide professional development for special education teachers on curriculum and effective instructional practices.

 

Professional learning on Unique Learning Systems (ULS) for teachers in kindergarten through Adult Transition programs. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Medi-Cal $0 Budgeted $3,000 for Medi-Cal?

Substitutes and materials for professional learning for teachers in mildmoderate programs. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Special Education $411 Budgeted $7,040 increase compensation $6,629

Clarification is needed -  

Total Budgeted for this Action was $10,040. CUSD is stating that it spent $411 to send 205 staff members to training. Not possible a sub has to be hired for each employe $105.00 per sub per day X 205 employees = $21,525 just in sub expenses.

Why would CUSD budget $3,000 for Medi-Cal under this action? 

Over Budget $ 6,629.00

OVER BUDGET: $6,629.00

Compensation Increases $6,629.00

Provided professional learning for special education teachers on curriculum and effective instructional practices. Professional learning for teachers on Unique Learning Systems occurred during collaboration time and after school. No costs were incurred.

A pilot was also conducted at Del Obispo Elementary School on the SPIRE curriculum. Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) training (de-escalation training) was held for 205 teachers, administrators, and classified staff.

Additional training occurred on transition plan development during teacher collaboration time.

 

Goal 1 Action 10: 

Provide interventions for students at academic, social-emotional, and behavioral risk.

 

Counselors 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $3,106,251 Budgeted $3,200,000 decrease $93,749.00

$3 million on Counselors? When we have no Art Music Science - Large class sizes and our facilities have not bee fixed or maintained for 15 years.

School Attendance Review Board and Alternative To Suspension Support 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Base $123,806 Budgeted $100,000 compensation increase $23,806.

Alternative To Suspension Support 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Base $56,289 Budgeted $35,000 compensation increase $21,289.

Credit Recovery teacher additional assignment 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $187,630. Budgeted $74,000 compensation increase $113,630.

Note- This is for CCP. Not only does this class hurt a-g completion rates, it is the bulk of CUSD's credit recovery. Waste of time and money for students.

Secondary intervention sections for focus middle schools 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $184,508 Budgeted $160,000 compensation increase $24,508.

Ticket To Read 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Supplemental $85,000 Budgeted $52,500 increase $32,500.

OVER BUDGET: $215,733.00

Compensation Increases $183,233.00

Ticket 2 Read $32,500

 

Fully implemented interventions for students at academic, social-emotional, and behavioral risk.

Counselors provided social-emotional support to students. Counselors conducted lessons with Second Step (K-8) and Signs of Suicide (grade 10) curriculum, assisted with social, emotional, and behavioral development, and whole school prevention and small group and individual intervention and responsive services.

Middle school leadership teams participated in restorative practices professional learning.

Elementary and middle school leadership teams participated in Positive Behavior Systems professional learning.

SARB and ATS Counselor monitored SARB letters, provided school support for DA meetings and hearings, and provided social-emotional counseling for ATS program. ATS teacher supported general and special education students in the ATS program with goal setting and academics

 

Goal 1 Action 11: 

Enhance screening tools and other assessments to identify and monitor students requiring interventions.

 

Canadian Model for Education which the State of California adopted without any Public Input-

The belief is that differentiated learning and class size are irrelevant to academic success. The most important thing is professional development and training for teachers and staff.

Trustee Hatton Hodson'scompany InnovateEd is part of Systems Leadership Collaborative:

Made up of:

 

MTSS supplies, materials, and assessments 4000-4999: Books And Supplies Supplemental $35,000 Budgeted $40,000 decrease of $5,000

Child Behavior Pathways 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $24,999 Budgeted $25,000

DIBELS - printing costs 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Base $3,000 Budgeted $6,100 spending cut $3,100.

Under Budget $1,900

 

UNDER BUDGET $8,100

MTS Supplies decrease $5,000

Dibbles Printing decrease by $3,100

 

Utilized screening tools and other assessments to identify and monitor students requiring interventions.

Passport intervention curriculum materials (grades 1-5), DIBELS Next assessments, and the Ticket To Read electronic learning program were implemented at all elementary schools.

Purchased additional supplemental counseling resources and enhanced District school counseling library for counselor check-out.

Parents and students ages 1-5 years participated in the Child Behavior Pathways 8-week pilot program for behavior assessment and intervention.

Universally screened/identified 3rd grade GATE students.

GATE:

CUSD may "identify" GATE students but there is almost no programing for accelerated stdudents within CUSD.

CUSD Staff; without Board Approval, made the unilateral decision to stop funding accelerated programing for high achieving students.

Board Audio at 190.24 (3 hours 10 minutes and 24 seconds)  
 
Superintendent Vital:
 
"I think that one of the outcomes of tonight is because this was something that was happening at the Staff level without the Board, having a conversation with the Board, and getting your values is really important. And so, I think what I have heard is that the majority of you very much want to see a GATE like program with some level of humm - separation... I don't know another word. Some way of meeting the needs of kids in that way and that we need to build some programming and potentially bring that conversation back along with some evidence and research about what this means or doesn't mean for all kids. Frankly this helps us to be able start this conversation because before what was happening is that in isolation, not now, a year or two ago making some plans without the Board. So I do think this is important and we are happy as a staff to be able to given that value to build something and bring that back.  Does that make sense?" 
 
For full detail: GATE

 

Goal 1 Action 12: Provide management and oversight of districtwide interventions and site support.

 

 

Director and Coordinators 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $388,382 Budgeted $367,328 compensation increase $21,054.

Site coordination additional assignment (including Student Success Team coordination) 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $115,804 Budgeted $120,825 compensation increase $5,021.

Sr. Staff Secretary 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $89,427 Budgeted $71,642 compensation increase $43,860.

OVER BUDGET $43,860

Compensation Increase $43,860

 

Implemented management and oversight of districtwide interventions and site support.

Director, Intervention, Coordinators of Credit Recovery and SST, and Sr. Staff Secretary remained in place.

Coordination and additional assignment was for school counselor showcase for community outreach and for Lead Counselor to support school counseling program (communication tools and assessment systems).

Additional assignment hours were given to site intervention coordinators to support the reading intervention implementation.

 

Goal 1 Action 13: Provide interventions for foster students. 

Academic tutoring and after school program 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $2,000 Budgeted $5,000.

Note: CUSD has 128 Foster children in the System.

Source: Data Quest

$2,000/128 = $15.63 per student - that will not buy a single hour of tutoring?

UNDER BUDGET $3,000

Tutoring Foster Kids $3,000

Provided academic tutoring intervention and after school care for foster students.

Conducted outreach to parents and foster liaisons.

 

Goal 1 Action 14: Provide a program reflecting a broad course of study including STEM, CTE, VAPA, and electives.

Supplemental instructional materials - STEM 4000-4999: Books And Supplies Base $32,926 Budgeted $30,000 Increase $2,926

Executive Director, Career Technical Education 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $81,486 Budgeted $79,816 Compensation Increase $1,670

Coordinator, Visual and Performing Arts 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $124,531 Budgeted $155,000 compensation increase $30,469.

Career Technical Education 4000-4999: Books And Supplies CTE Incentive Grant $2,500,000 Budgeted $2,373,545 

OC STEM Partnership $0

CapoForward Supplies and Materials 4000-4999: Books And Supplies Base $49,000

CapoForward was not planned or Budgeted for. Source: June 7 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda page 15 of 367.

CUSD has spent well over $500,000.00 on this. The contract with Album Agency is up to $300,000.00 and Discovery Education is another $250,000.

Where did this non-budgeted money come from?

Discovery Education

Jan 25, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #18 page 520

This is a $269,500 3 year contract for Professional Development Training in STEM.

Period 1- 2016-17 $93,500.00

Period 2 - 2017-18 $88,000.00 

Period 3- 2018-19 $88,000.00

Documentation: CUSDWatch: Discovery Education Professional Development

Album Agency:

Cost of Marketing Materials to rebrand 7 under enrolled schools.

April 19, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #4 page 127 staff amended its contract with Album Agency to increase the amount from $175,000 to $300,000.00 

Documentation: CUSDWatch: Contract Agreement with Album Agency

Documentation: CUSDWatch: #CapoForward Strategic Vision 

OVER BUDGET $210,520

Employee Compensation $32,139

Books & Supplies $2,926.00

CTE Grant $126,455.00

CAPO Forward $49,000

 

Provided a program reflecting a broad course of study including STEM, CTE, VAPA, and electives.

Consumable science materials were purchased for elementary hands-on science materials (FOSS kits).  

Middle schools purchased 6th grade science materials for NGSS transition.

CapoForward - Pilot schools with progressive thematic approach transformed their educational programs through collaborative teaching practices resulting in increased student outcomes.

Pre-K-grade 12 stakeholders developed an Ecosystem Sustainability plan to implement and sustain STEM in CUSD.

Note: CUSD has spent close to $500,000 rebranding under-enrolled schools.

On April 27, 2016 Principals from seven CUSD elementary schools made a presentation to the Board for a three year blue print to "re-image" their schools. As part of "Moving Capo Forward", these schools are going through an educational makeover designed to attract students to schools with declining enrollment and prevent the District from having to close schools by providing each school with a new educational focus.

The seven schools are:

  • Del Obispo - College and Career Readiness/AVID 
  • Hidden Hills - Technology
  • Kinoshita - College and Career Readiness/AVID
  • Lobo Elementary - STEAM
  • Marblehead - Environmental Studies
  • R.H. Dana - Science and Technology
  • Wood Canyon - Arts and Media

Presentations:

December 14, 2016 Kinoshita, Marblehead

January 25, 2017 RH Dana, Hidden Hills, Lobo

February 22, 2017 Del Obispo, Wood Canyon

 

 

Goal 1 Action 15: Provide college readiness and support program for potential first generation college attendees. 

 

 

AVID Participation fee 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $75,000 Budgeted $75,000

AVID Participation fee 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Title I $6,950

AVID Summer Intensive Teacher Professional Learning 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Base $24,857 Budgeted $96,735 decrease $71,878

At page 18 of 367 (page 17 of LCAP) CUSD states: 

The AVID membership fee was reduced and AVID tutors were hired with the balance of the allocation. Professional learning on ULS was done during teacher collaboration time, so the $3,000 was not needed.

UNDER BUDGET $71,878

Professional Development $71,878

 

Provided college readiness and support program for potential first generation college attendees.

In additional to the AVID participation fee, AVID Tutors were hired and provided support at several middle and high schools.

 

 

Goal 1 Action 16: Provide college readiness assessments and activities.

 

 

Naviance 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $56,931 Budgeted $57,000 decrease $69

College Fair in collaboration with CUCPTSA 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Base $1,722 Budgeted $5,000 decrease $3,278

Two College and Career Counselors 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $170,927 Budgeted $200,000 compensation decrease.

Coordinator, College and Career 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Supplemental $92,846 Budgeted $120,000 compensation decrease.

PSAT Grades 10 and 11 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $107,880 Budgeted $107,880

Under Budget $30,501

Compensation $27,154

UNDER BUDGET $27,154

Compensation $27,154

Implemented college readiness assessments and activities.

Naviance was utilized by the College and Career Counselors. Collaborated with CUCPTSA on the 2nd Annual College Fair.

Futureology college and career program was developed and implemented offering one-on-one sessions, group sessions, bootcamps, and webinars.

PSAT was offered to all 10th and 11th grade students

Naviance

Naviance, at all Districts is a tool used by High school students to track college applications and help with college and career choices. Unique to CUSD, Naviance Family is embeded into CCP and other core educational programs which means there is no way for parents to Opt Out of social and emotional testing and personality tests. CUSD is forcing families to share personally identifiable data with for- profit companies.

Futureology

Friday April 28, 2017 Red Ribbon Cutting for FUTUREology at the Shops of Mission Viejo website: http://www.cusd-futureology.org/

CUSD does not have sufficient funding to provide every student with Art, Music or Science; to reduce class sizes to reasonable levels or to fix and maintain facilities, but it does have sufficient funding to staff full time Counselors at the Mission Viejo mall to provide after school college and career ready advice and counseling. 

PSAT:

CUSD OPTED ALL 9th 10th and 11th Grades students into PSAT without parental permission and no ability to opt out.

Learn more: 

CUSD Intentionally Mis-lead the Public

 

Goal 1 Action 17: Increase the number of students with disabilities succeeding in general education classes. 

 

 

Provided Professional Development on effective collaborative model between general education and special education teachers. 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Special Education $0 Budgeted $8,000 - spent -0-

TOSAs provided mentoring and coaching to teachers to support students with disabilities access to effective instruction in core curriculum. 1000- 1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Special Education $500,000 Budgeted $400,000 compensation increase $100.00

UNDER BUDGET $7,900

Compensation $100.00

Professional Development ($8,000)

Enhanced the success of students with disabilities in general education classes.

Co-teaching training was held at Marco Forster where six general education and six special education teachers and the principal participated.

Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs) provided instructional support to new teachers, IEP development, and teaching support.

Autism support team provided autism training to 100 certificated and classified staff

 

Goal 1 Action 18: Expand broad course of study through shifts from accelerated classes to honors classes with pacing guide development. 

 

 

Pacing Guide Development 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Educator Effectiveness $4,905. Budgeted $4,000 compensation increase $905

Over Budget $905.00

OVER BUDGET $905.00 

Compensation Increase $905.00

Added Honors World History course and developed the Curriculum Alignment Guide (CAG) for it.

Developed Physical Education CAG and refined other CAGs

 

Goal 1 Action 19: Expand and enhance partnership with Saddleback College - expand college pathways with certificate track while in high school. 

 

 

Monthly Saddleback College High School Partnership Council $0

Expanded and enhanced the partnership with Saddleback College. Currently in the process of solidifying the Saddleback College Promise for tangible outcomes for high school students.

Looking to increase enrichment opportunities for elementary and middle school students.

Expanded certifications with Saddleback College in Surgical Tech, Pharmacy Tech, and Dental Assisting.

 

 

ANALYSIS:  Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal.

Great First Instruction 

http://www.cucptsa.com/uploads//GFI_PAC_Nov14_2016.pdf Presentation by the PTA? 

Professional Learning Communities (PLC's)

The idea of improving schools by developing professional learning communities. People use this term to describe every imaginable combination of individuals with an interest in education—a grade-level teaching team, a school committee, a high school department, an entire school district, a state department of education, a national professional organization, and so on. CUSD pulled so many teachers out of the classroom this year for meetings, trainings and Professional Development that CUSD teachers have a very high "Chronic Absentee" rate leaving students with subs on a pretty frequent basis. The cost per sub is $105 per day, while the teacher is also paid. This is in additional to the cost of the training. Did the lack of a consistent classroom teachers hurt student achievement more the the Professional Development helped?

Multi-tierd System of Support http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/cr/ri/mtsscomprti2.asp

In California, MTSS is an integrated, comprehensive framework that focuses on CCSS, core instruction, differentiated learning, student-centered learning, individualized student needs, and the alignment of systems necessary for all students' academic, behavioral, and social success.

Response to intervention, multitiered systems of supports, positive behavioral supports and interventions. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2016/12/14/what-are-multitiered-systems-of-supports.html

Increase post-secondary options for all students.

The increase in focus career and vocational training is great for those students that do not want to attend college after high school and would prefer to go straight into the work force. But there needs to be a balance so that those students who do plan to attend a 4- year college or university after high school, have the opportunity to do so. CUSD has made the decision to limit funding for accelerated programing for high achieving students. With unique curriculum choices like making CCP/Stand Alone Health a graduation requirement, every child who wants to complete A-G course requirements to get into 4-year college is instantly one year behind after their freshman year unless they take summer school, or zero period. CUSD lacks basic honors classes like Geometry Honors. The lack of accelerated programming makes it difficult for students to get needed bumps in GPA to compete with peers at other local schools, and across the world. When all is said and done- CUSD's curriculum, emphasis on Career and the lack of instruction in all core subjects that aligns with California Minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks that is taught by a properly credentialed teacher, is the main reason that 75% of CUSD students have no option but Community College or a Career after High School. CUSD is preparing 3/4 of it's students for a job or Community College. Parents need to understand that so that those students who plan to use High School to get into a 4- year college are not prevented from doing so.

Implemented Passport Intervention Curriculum Grades 1-5  

Voyager Passport intervenes early to accelerate learning for students who need supplemental instruction to master priority reading skills and strategies.

Source: http://www.voyagersopris.com/curriculum/subject/literacy/voyager-passport/overview

Increase CTE Pathways

Added Energy & Power, Food Science & Hospitality, Animal Science, Product Innovation & Design, Networking

Furtureology

Why is CUSD funding after-hour counselors at the Mission Viejo mall BEFORE it funds Core educational programs for all students. CUSD must include in it's budget Art, Music and Science instruction that aligns with minimum State Content Standards and Curriculum Frameworks that is taught by an appropriately credentialed teacher BEFORE ANYTHING ELSE. Relying on fundraising and donations creates wealth based inequities within the District that are illegal. Using one-time money for on-going core educational programs must end.

 

ANALYSIS: Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA.

The Statement that ALL Student Groups met the Target of a 3% increase (from 56% to 59% met or exceeded the Standard is a FALSE STATEMENT.

In ELA 69% - No change from 2015 to 2016.

In Math 59% - 3% Increase from 56% to 59%

Smarter Balanced Assessment English Language Arts

All Students made no progress or declined in 2016 except for those students who exceeded the Standard. They increased their performance in ELA by 2%. 

Standard Exceeded: 2015 33% - 2016 35% - Increase 2%

Standard Met: 2015 36% - 2016 34% - Decrease 2%

Standard Nearly Met: 2015 18% - 2016 17% - Decrease 1%

Standard Not Met: 2015 14% - 2016 14% - No Change

69% are meeting or exceeding standards - No Change from 2015

Source: CAASPP

Smarter Balanced Assessment Math

All Students made no progress or declined in 2016 except for those students who exceeded the Standard. They increased their performance in Math by 4%.

Standard Exceeded: 2015 28% - 2016 32% - Increase 4%

Standard Met: 2015 28% - 2016 27% - Decrease 1%

Standard Nearly Met: 2015 25% - 2016 23% - Decrease 2%

Standard Not Met: 2015 19% - 2016 18% - Decrease 1%

59% are meeting or exceeding standards- Increase 3% from 2015- 56%

Source: CAASPP

The English Learner Reclassification Rate Increased 1.6%

The Goal was 3% so the stated goal was NOT MET.

The High School Graduation Rate Increased .5% to 97.1% 

CUSD has the lowest possible graduation requirements - allowing students to pass with a "D". Most schools require a "C". 

 

ANALYSIS: Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

Was this $3,000 averted to cover Medi-Cal for Certificated Teachers?

The CUSD LCAP Fails to Explain the $1,311,461 million in expenditures beyond their budget: 

$1.3 Million Over Budget

$1.1 million Employee Compensation/Professional Development

$49 thousand CAPO Forward - NEW! Not in original LCAP

$10 thousand GATE - NEW! Not in original LCAP

 

$131,202.00 Reductions:

Action 2 - Books and Supplies: $9,901 

Action 9 - Medi-Cal Certificated Employees $3,000

Action 11 - MTS Supplies $5,000 - Dibbles Printing $3,100

Action 13 - Tutoring for Forster Children $3,000

Action 15 - Professional Development $71,878

Action 16 - Compensation $27,154 - Naviance $69

Action 17 - Compensation $100 - Professional Development $8,000

 

 

ANALYSIS: Describe any changes made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services to achieve this goal as a result of this analysis and analysis of the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable. Identify where those changes can be found in the LCAP.

The CUSD LCAP Fails to Explain the $1,311,461 million in expenditures that was NOT INCLUDED in the LCAP: 

Support for students who are English Learners

Support for students who are English learners continues to be a focus. Additional supplemental middle and high school sections for English language development were added in 2016-2017 and they will continue in 2017-2018 to provide support for staffing classes with proper language levels at reduced class sizes. The new Coordinator, English Learner Services was implemented in 2016-2017 to provide leadership with the ELA/ELD adoption and integrated and designated English language development. This position will continue in 2017-2018 to provide continued support in this area. These actions along with the other actions targeted to students who are English learners will address the State Indicator Academic English language arts and Mathematics gap (All Students - Green; English Learners - Yellow). 

CUSD chose to cut Summer EL Support and CELDT Testing. 

CUSD spent $324,780 to provide lower class sizes to help ELL students reclassify.

This creates inequities in the District. CUSD justifies ridiculously large class sizes for everyone else stating that "data shows that class size and differentiated learning makes no difference in academic performance". Well apparently it does as evidenced by CUSD's increased spending to reduce class sizes for this particular group of students. 

Reading Intervention 

Professional learning on the reading intervention curriculum in grades 1-5, revision of the Student Success Team procedures, and pilot intervention sections at the middle schools occurred in 2016-2017. Continued implementation of the reading intervention curriculum, implementation of the revised Student Success Team procedures, and sections for secondary intervention are planned for 2017-2018.

CUSD chose to cut spending on Dibbles by reducing printing costs by $3,100. That is over half of the printing costs - did they reduce testing of students by 1/2?

College & Career

College and Career Counselors and College and Career Coordinator were implemented in 2016-2017 who implemented one-on-one sessions, bootcamps, and webinars. These expenditures will continue in 2017- 2018 as stated in Action 16 on pages 51-52.

Should expenditures on after hour counselors paid to work outside the district come before every student has access to a basic core curriculum which includes District funded Art, Music and Science? 

Professional LearningCommunities

Professional Learning Communities were implemented in 2016-2017 and will continue in 2017-2018 (see Goal 1, Action 2, page 32. A focus on Pre-K to grade 12 articulation started in 2016-2017 and will continue in 2017-2018 with enhanced focus on grade 5 to 6 and grade 8 to 9 transition. 

Does taking teachers out of the classroom really benefit students?

Student Engagement

To increase student engagement, a participation tracking system will be implemented to track high school student participation in activities and athletic events. Students who have little to no participation can be provided outreach to engage them in school - see Goal 1, Action 10, page 44

More personally identifiable information data collection.

To continue to provide access and equity for students to take Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate tests, test fee reimbursements have been added to Goal 1, Action 18 on page 54.

Test Fee reimbursement is limited to Low Income High School students. Stop creating inequities within CUSD based on wealth.

 

 

 GOAL 2

Communicate with, and engage students, parents, employees, and community members in Districtwide and community-specific
decisions.

2 measurable outcomes

4 Actions

Measurable Outcome 1

Comprehensive strategies communications plan implementation.

Facebook Likes:

July 2015 560

July of 2016 967

Increase of 407 

 

CapoTalk Subscribers

July 2015 39,332

July of 2016 67,017

Increase of 27,685

 

Listserve and School Messenger

School site principals ended the use of listserv and used School Messenger as the primary vehicle for parent communication.

 

Twitter:

CUSD Communications Department maintain CUSD and Superintendent Twitter accounts and does daily and often multiple daily updates. 

 

 

 

Measurable Outcome 2

Increase participation by parents from underrepresented student groups in parent information and support activities 

a. Portal accounts representing all students

2015-2016 49,886

2016-17 59,564

Increase 9,678

b. Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE)

2015-2016 453 parents of students who are ELL

2016-17 548 parents of students who are ELL

Increase 95

c. PTSA membership representing all students

2015-2016 was 24,441.

2016-2017 membership numbers are pending.

 

 

Action 1 - NEEDS TO BE CORRECTED

Facilitate effective communications with CUSD families and stakeholders 

BUDGETED:

Chief Communications Officer (Public Information Officer) 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Base $178,526 Budgeted $160,232 Increase Compensation by $18,330

School Messenger 5800:Professional/ Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Base $83,052 Budgeted $83,052 - On Budget

Schoolloop 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Base $121,107 Budgeted $114,582 - over budget by $6,525

GATE parent and teacher advisory meetings 1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries Base $10,880 GATE was not a budgeted item. Increase Compensation $10,880

 

Facilitated effective communications with CUSD families and stakeholders.

GATE:

Engaged stakeholders to examine and refine Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) program to offer and enhance a
differentiated GATE curriculum. Held teacher and parent

GATE advisory group meetings. 

 

GATE:

GATE was not a budgeted item. Board Agenda page 20 of 367 It was added after the 2016-17 LCAP had been approved.

November 16, 2016 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #31 page 463

Board Audio at 169:13 (2 hours 49 minutes 13 seconds)

Supporting Documentation: CUSDWatch Nov. 16th Meeting Agenda Item #12

Under Local Control each District decides how money will be spent. The State eliminated Categorical funding for GATE. CUSD Staff; without Board approval, made the unilateral decision to stop funding GATE and other programming for high achieving students.

For example CUSD is the only school district in south Orange County that has no Geometry Honors Class.

Without Board of Trustee approval District Staff has begun to eliminate funding for accelerated programing for high achieving students. CUSD's GATE program has effectively died. Concerned parents are now appealing to the Board to provide funding and special programming for CUSD's high achieving students. 

Statement on the record from Superintendent Kristen Vital regarding elimination of funding for GATE programming and other programming for high achieving students

November 16, 2016 BOT Meeting Agenda 

Board Audio at 190.24 (3 hours 10 minutes and 24 seconds) 

Supporting Documentation: CUSDWatch Nov.16th Meeting Agenda Item #31

CUSD hired Hannover Partners to study data to determine if there is any real value to differentiated learning. This item contained a discussion of the value of class size, differentiated learning, and funding accelerated programing for high achieving students. 

January 25, 2017 BOT Meeting  Item #20 page 530 

Board Audio 75:50 (1 hour 15 minutes 50 seconds)

Supporting Documentation: CUSDWatch Jan. 25th Meeting Agenda Item #20

The State of California adopted the Canadian Model of Education which believes that class size and differentiated learning have no bearing on academic achievement. Highly trained teachers and staff are the only thing that directly effects academic achievement. The Canadian model believes that Professional Development - staff collaboration and data driven education decisions will result in the greatest academic achievement for students. 

Staff - without Board Approval - has unilaterally eliminated programing for CUSD's high achieving students. The Hannover Research was conducted to prove this belief. The results of the study have never been shared with the Public to date. 

February 22, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #12 page 272 

Board Audio: 65:30 (1 hour 5 minutes 30 seconds) 

 

Action 2

Facilitate effective communications with CUSD families and stakeholders

Contracted translation services 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Supplemental $42,032 Budgeted $23,000 Over Budget by $19,032

Ensured translation of school documents for schools with 15% or more English learners through Bilingual Community Services Liaisons and contracted translation support.

 

Action 3

Facilitate communication, parent education, and engagement of parents of English learners

Bilingual Community Services Liaisons 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Supplemental $1,021,238 Budgeted $1,147,755 Decreased Compensation $126,517.

Parent Education programs such as Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) 5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating Expenditures Title III $55,000 Budgeted $60,000 Decreased Budget by $5,000

DELAC meeting childcare 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries
Supplemental $800 Budgeted $800 - On Budget

CUSD spent less money than budgeted on Translating services and PIQE.

Ensured translation of school documents for schools with 15% or more English learners through Bilingual Community Services Liaisons and contracted translation support.

 

Action 4

Provide Parent Support Network program to engage parents of students with special needs

Parent Support Network administrator 1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries Medi-Cal $13,806 Budgeted $20,000 Decreased Medi-Cal $6,194

Medi- Cal? How does payment for Medi-Cal relate to providing a Parent Support Network for students with Special Needs?

Provided Parent Support Network program to engage parents of students with special needs.

 

ANALYSIS

Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal

 

LCAPca was actually designed through a Partnership between Trustee Hatton- Hodson's company InnovateEd + ACSA (Association of California School Administrators) + Progress Advisors. 

http://www.lcapca.com/expert-help.cfm

The Goal of California's LCAP is to allow parents and community members to have greater input in the educational priorities of their local school district, and provide greater transparency on how district money is spent.

Parents have continually expressed their desire to have lower class sizes and differentiated instruction.

Parents have repeatedly expressed their desire see CUSD spend money to reduce class sizes. However, CUSD has used class size increases to balance their budget for the past 10 years.

Parents have repeatedly expressed their desire see CUSD spend money to provide educational opportunities for the District's high achieving students by funding a real GATE program, and offering Honor's Classes (ie- Geometry Honors) that will allow students who want to attend a 4-year college to be able to compete with their peers in other Districts by having a competitive GPA. 

Parents have repeatedly expressed that CCP/Stand alone Health as a graduation requirement (a graduation requirement unique to CUSD) should be eliminated because it crowds out an entire block of coursework for all students that could be used to complete an A-G course. Students who want to attend a 4-year college after graduation are currently forced to take zero period or summer school for two years to complete their A-G required courses.

The Public continues to express concern for the special needs students in the District who are being forced into mainstream classrooms without the programing and help they need to improve academically. Overcrowded classrooms without differentiated learning.

"COMMUNICATION" by definition is a dialogue between two parties. The purpose of the LCAP is to encourage local school school districts to "LISTEN" to parents and the public when forming educational policy.

CUSD does not hear...

CUSD does not have a "Communication" plan. It has a marketing plan rooted in social media. Likes on Facebook- Increases in CapoTalk subscribers and daily tweets allow the District to send messages but nothing has been done to improve the communication from parents to CUSD.

Staff has it's own agenda which follows the Canadian model of education which places as its number one priority Professional Development for educational leaders. Class size does not matter. Differentiated Instruction does not matter. 

The Public should understand that both Superintendent Vital and Trustee Hatton-Hodson are fully invested in this model and have pushed students into a curriculum and budget that has actually resulted in the decline in academic performance of students across all demographics as the data in Goal 1 clearly shows.

http://innovateed.com/systems-leadership-collaborative/ 

Systems Leadership Collaborative

Lead by ACSA, Michael Fullan, InnovateEd, The Flippin Group and Fagen, Friedman and Fulfrost was designed to help school districts successfully implement their LCAPs. Trustee Hatoon-Hodson resigned from her position as Trustee, and is now living in northern California on her 55 acre ranch in Grass Valley and her company will be profiting by teaching LCAP workshops. During her tenure as Trustee, her business has grown from less than one million in sales to over three million.

https://www.acsa.org/Educational-Services/LCAP

Superintendent Kristen Vital was Part of the Alliance for Excellent Education's advisory group in 2006. The Alliance for Excellent Education; in partnership with the US Department of Education, leads "Future Ready Schools". Future Ready Schools builds on the momentum of President Obama's Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the ConnectED Initiative. The goal is to foster and lead a culture of digital learning in their district, and to share what they have learned with other districts. To facilitate connectivity, the President formed the Office of Education Technology. 

"LOCAL CONTROL" - "COMMON CORE" - "COLLEGE AND CAREER READY" started at the Federal Level and is being implemented from the top down. Data is being collected on every student and will result in a dossier on every student from pre-school to adult. Such data collection is now including personality testing and metal health information which was once protected by HIPPA. 

 

ANALYSIS

Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA

 

 

ANALYSIS

Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures

 

The following material differences have been identified and need to be explained BEFORE the 2016-17 LCAP Annual Review is approved by the Board on Wednesday June 28, 2017.

 

GOAL 3

Optimize facilities and learning environments for all students.

4 Measurable Outcomes

2 Actions

Measurable Outcome 1

Standards for facility maintenance (good repair) will be met.

FIT scores for all schools met Good repair standard. Five schools scored Exemplary. 

That statement is false and the LCAP should be amended to reflect the real conditions of learning at CUSD.

CUSD hires NO NAME-ADRESS-PHONE NUMBER- "Facilities Inspection Services Incorporated" which does business as "CSC- Lawyers Incorporating Service"

Documentation: CUSDWatch- May 24, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #34 Districtwide Facilities Condition Assessment Services Proposal 

Schools- irrespective of their actual conditions are marked "GOOD".

CUSD wants to pass a new school facilities bond so they hired Kitchell to study Ambuehl Elementary School as a test. 

While Facilities Inspection Services incorporated showed "GOOD" on Ambuehl's SARC Report- Kitchell found the following:

The Kitchell Study found that Ambuehl has facilities that violate the Williams Settlement.

The legislation implementing the Williams settlement requires that every school district provide a uniform complaint process for complaints regarding insufficient instructional materials, unsafe or unhealthy facility conditions, and teacher vacancies and mis-assignments.

The findings of Kitchell would violate the Williams Settlement requiring that the State of California would not mandate that students attend Ambuehl Elementary School if the facilities were unsafe or unhealthy.

The Kitchell study found the following which would violate the Williams settlement and gave the school a rating of POOR:

  • General Buildings: Life safety, ADA, inadequate restroom quantity
  • Mechanical Systems: Poor condition, end of useful life, rust, corrosion. Two
    units inoperable
  • Plumbing Systems: Inoperable water heater, water fountains, calcium build up
  • Electrical Systems: Switchgear & panels past useful life, lamp replacement
    difficult, added receptacles required
  • Fire Alarm Systems: Panel in poor condition
  • Fire Sprinkler Systems: No fire sprinkler in main building

The Associated Costs of Immediate (Williams Complaint) Repairs: $990,954.00

CUSD has given employees across the board compensation increases totalling over $120 million dollars while forcing students and staff to attend a school that is "unsafe" and "unhealthy". 

 

 

Measurable Outcome 2

Williams Act facilities inspections will reflect compliance

Kinoshita and Viejo elementary schools scored in Good repair status on the FIT.

Are they really Good? The Public won't know until Kitchell does a facilities report on them.

 

Measurable Outcome 3

Site discretionary supply accounts will return to baseline levels

Site discretionary supply accounts continued at baseline levels and were also enhanced with additional one-time money. 

 

Measurable Outcome 4

Planning for implementation of anti-bullying/cyber-bullying curriculum.

Implemented Second Step (K-8) curriculum for bullying prevention.

In 2014-2015, there were 133 bully logs (107 founded, 26 unfounded).

In 2015-2016, there were 77 bully logs (53 founded, 24 unfounded).

There was a 42% reduction in bully logs. 

Implemented Districtwide digital citizenship program.

 

Action 1

Ensure that facilities are clean, safe, and functional

 

 

Deferred maintenance 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Base $2,500,000 Budgeted $2,500.00 - On Budget

Routine Maintenance (Classified employees) 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Base $8,443,000 Budgeted $8,443.00 - On Budget

Routine Maintenance (services and supplies) 5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures Base $5,780,000 Budgeted $5,780.00 - On Budget

Implemented Prop. 39 grant plan to increase facility energy efficiency 6000- 6999: Capital Outlay State Defined $6,000,000  Budgeted $6,000.00 - On Budget

Facilities and Finance Committee $0

ON BUDGET

 

Ensured that facilities are clean, safe, and functional.

EPIC FAILURE AS EVIDENCED BY THE KITCHELL FACILITIES STUDY OF AMBUHL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Fully implemented deferred and routine maintenance.

Facilities Finance Committee met three times (February, March, and April, 2017) to discuss facilities and how the financing works.
This committee will continue in 2017-2018.

Asbestos

Condemed buildings on San Clemente Upper Campus

 

Action 2

Enhance learning environment and effectively address bullying and/or cyber bullying

 

 

Teacher training for Digital Citizenship/Cyber Bullying curriculum $0

Training for systematic bullying procedures $0

Planning for Districtwide anti-bullying curriculum $0

Campus Supervisor and Student Supervisor training 2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries Base $7,551 Budgeted $5,000

OVER BUDGET $2,551 

Compensation Increase $2,551

Enhanced learning environment and effectively addressed
bullying and/or cyber bullying.

Principals and Assistant Principals received training on bully prevention procedures in August, 2016.

Second Step (K-8) program was implemented (Skills for learning, empathy, emotional management, problem solving), as part of bullying prevention.

Campus Supervisors participated in Campus Security Training
(SB1626) in August 2016.

 

ANALYSIS

Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal

May 24, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #34 Districtwide Facilities Condition Assessment Services Proposal:  page 346
RED FLAG: City of San Juan Capistrano and Ambuehl Elementary School Parents 

Background:

CUSD hired Kitchell to do a facilities study on Ambuehl Elementary School as a test to see if they wanted to hire this company to do a full districtwide facilities condition assessment services proposal. This Agenda Item presents the results of the Ambuehl study and asks the Board to approve a contract in the amount of $599,744.75 to complete a districtwide facilities needs study. The $599,744.75 will be paid for out of the Deferred Maintenance Fund.

 

 

Kitchell
4179 Viewridge Avenue
Suite 130
San Diego , CA 92123
web site: http://www.kitchell.co

A BLUE CARD SHOULD HAVE BEEN PULLED

The Kitchell Study found that Ambuehl has facilities that violate the Williams Settlement.

The legislation implementing the Williams settlement requires that every school district provide a uniform complaint process for complaints regarding insufficient instructional materials, unsafe or unhealthy facility conditions, and teacher vacancies and mis-assignments.

The findings of Kitchell would violate the Williams Settlement requiring that the State of California would not mandate that students attend Ambuehl Elementary School if the facilities were unsafe or unhealthy.

The Kitchell study found the following which would violate the Williams settlement and gave the school a rating of POOR:

  • General Buildings: Life safety, ADA, inadequate restroom quantity
  • Mechanical Systems: Poor condition, end of useful life, rust, corrosion. Two
    units inoperable
  • Plumbing Systems: Inoperable water heater, water fountains, calcium build up
  • Electrical Systems: Switchgear & panels past useful life, lamp replacement
    difficult, added receptacles required
  • Fire Alarm Systems: Panel in poor condition
  • Fire Sprinkler Systems: No fire sprinkler in main building

The Associated Costs of Immediate (Williams Complaint) Repairs: $990,954.00

CUSD has given employees across the board compensation increases totalling over $120 million dollars while forcing students and staff to attend a school that is "unsafe" and "unhealthy". 

CUSD hires NO NAME-ADRESS-PHONE NUMBER- "Facilities Inspection Services Incorporated" which does business as "CSC- Lawyers Incorporating Service"

Source at page 45 of 388:  

Source: CA Secretary of State

Contract is being approved on the May 24, 2017 BOT Meeting as Agenda Item #4 page 51 of 388 for $41,880.00. Ambuehl Elementary has been given a "GOOD" on all SCARC reports from these Inspectors hired by CUSD.

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7no0GfL-TcgWXBQVnVlYlJXVU0/view

Ambuehl Elementary School SACR Report:

This is also in contrast to the facilities requirements specified in CUSD's Measure M documentation which INFLATED the needed repair costs at Ambuehl stating that preliminary cost estimates were $14.6 million while Kitchell who did a "recent study" stated $8,432,518.00. 

There is criminal activity going on within CUSD and a BLUE CARD should have been pulled for this consent item.

Source: CUSD Measure M Documentation for Ambuehl Elementary School

If the District truly intends to float a NEW Bond then the services of Kitchell will be valuable as CUSD has inflated the facilities needs cost on the November 2016 Measure M Bond by a criminal amount.

May 24, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #24 page 346

 

ANALYSIS

Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA.

NOT

AMBUEHL

ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL!

 

   

ANALYSIS

Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

Campus Supervisor and Student Supervisor training 2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries Base was increased by $2,551

   

ANALYSIS

Describe any changes made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services to achieve this goal as a result of this analysis and analysis of the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable. Identify where those changes can be found in the LCAP.

SARC Reports need to be corrected to accurately reflect the condition of facilities. Uniform Complaints need to be filed on any school that has health and safety issues so that those can be fixed before a single penny is spent on Professional Development or increases to employee compensation.

CUSD does not HEAR the public. There is no "Community Engagement"

With the adoption of the 2017-18 Budget, CUSD will have given employees 5 straight years of across the Board compensation increases totaling over $150 million dollars. While students attend school with staff to student ratios that are not safe in facilities that have not been fixed or maintained for over 15 years. Core educational classes are paid for with one time fundraising and donations and are taught by parent volunteers creating wealth based inequities in the quality of education that all students receive in violation of state law. 

The California Healthy Kids Survey is another method of Data mining students.

Source: CUSD Web Site

The California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) is a comprehensive youth health risk and resilience behavior data collection service available to all California districts, sponsored by the California Department of Education (CDE).  It consists of a comprehensive survey instrument that assesses all major areas of health-related behavior, as well as a full-service survey support system to help districts collect and use CHKS data to improve prevention and health programs.  At Capistrano Unified School District the survey is administered to 7, 9 and 11-grade students every other year in the Spring.  The next time the survey will be administrated is in the Spring of the 2017-2018 school year.

Full Documentation can be found at: CUSD is Selling Student Data an Open Letter to Elected Leaders

There is no meaningful stakeholder engagement at CUSD unless you are an employee of the district.

   

 

I have personally done two separate Citizen Requests:

January 27, 2016 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #5 page 7 of 535 "Fundraising for Core Educational Programs" 

CRICKETS- CUSD is still using Fundraising and Donations to pay for Core educational programs despite the fact that it creates wealth based inequities in the quality of education students receive within the District which is illegal.

and

June 7, 2017 BOT Meeting Agenda Item #23 page 344 "The Elimination of CCP/Stand Alone Health as a graduation requirement.

CRICKETS - Because of a 5 year contract with Hobbsons Naviance to Data Mine CUSD students CUSD (after granting my Citizens Request- quickly held two meetings to vote to continue CCP/Health through January 2018 which rendered my request meaningless.

There is no Taxpayer or PUBLIC engagement in CUSD.

 

CLASS SIZES:

Ryan Buris, Chief Communications Officer for CUSD released the following information regarding class sizes in CUSD:

Based on the compiled data, the District is currently ranked 19th of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in kindergarten.

Based on the compiled data, the District is currently tied and ranked 23rd of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in primary grades 1st - 3rd.
 

HUMMM? Should CUSD give employees their 5th consecutive across the board compensation increases or reduce class sizes to reasonable levels in Grades 1 -3? 

 Mr Burris then stated: 

"Based on the compiled data, the District is currently tied and ranked 14th of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in upper grades 4th - 8th.
 
This data clearly shows that the District is tied for the highest average class size in grades 1 - 3 in Orange County. However, the data also clearly shows that the average class size is not an outlier based on all Orange County Districts. Additionally, the data shows that the District does not have the highest average class sizes in kindergarten or upper grades. Based on this analysis it is clear that District class sizes are not the highest in comparisons to other Orange County Districts, therefore the District also cannot have the highest class sizes in the nation.
 
We hope you find this infomration useful.
Thank you,
ryan
_________________________
Ryan Burris
Chief Communications Officer
Capistrano Unified School District
949-234-9427"
 
The only way to check the voracity of Mr. Burris's statement is to get a roster of every classroom and see how many students are in each class. Averages do not tell the truth for the following reasons:
 
Example 1:
 
Las Palmas Elementary School: Receives $250,000 donation from the Leonard Family Foundation every year to keep class sizes low. This is a 2-way language immersion program which would suffer substantial harm if class sizes (especially in lower grades) got to large since 1/2 the kids start the program not being fluent or literate in Spanish and 1/2 are not fluent or literate in Spanish.
 
Kindergarten 25.6 to 1
 
 
First Grade 25 to 1
 
 
2nd Grade 29.6 to 1 
 
 
3rd Grade 27.8 to 1 
 
 
4th Grade 25.8 to 1 
 
 
5th Grade 25 to 1 
These lower class sizes pull the averages lower as a whole.
 
 
 
Example 2: Under enrolled schools (CUSD has 7) These are the Capo Forward Schools which CUSD spent a half million dollars to "re-brand".
 
 
RH Dana
  
Grade      
K   3 13.67
1st   3  
2nd   2  
3rd   3  
4th   2  
5th   2  
 
 
 
Del Obispo
 
 
Hidden Hills
 
 
Kinoshita
 
 
Clarence Lobo
 
 
Marblehead
 
 
Wood Canyon
 

CLASS SIZES:

Ryan Buris, Chief Communications Officer for CUSD released the following information regarding class sizes in CUSD:

Based on the compiled data, the District is currently ranked 19th of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in kindergarten.

Based on the compiled data, the District is currently tied and ranked 23rd of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in primary grades 1st - 3rd.
 

HUMMM? Should CUSD give employees their 5th consecutive across the board compensation increases or reduce class sizes to reasonable levels in Grades 1 -3? 

 Mr Burris then stated: 

"Based on the compiled data, the District is currently tied and ranked 14th of 24 Orange County school districts in the average class size in upper grades 4th - 8th.
 
This data clearly shows that the District is tied for the highest average class size in grades 1 - 3 in Orange County. However, the data also clearly shows that the average class size is not an outlier based on all Orange County Districts. Additionally, the data shows that the District does not have the highest average class sizes in kindergarten or upper grades. Based on this analysis it is clear that District class sizes are not the highest in comparisons to other Orange County Districts, therefore the District also cannot have the highest class sizes in the nation.
 
We hope you find this infomration useful.
Thank you,
ryan
_________________________
Ryan Burris
Chief Communications Officer
Capistrano Unified School District
949-234-9427"
 
The only way to check the voracity of Mr. Burris's statement is to get a roster of every classroom and see how many students are in each class. Averages do not tell the truth for the following reasons:
 
Example 1:
 
Las Palmas Elementary School: Receives $250,000 donation from the Leonard Family Foundation every year to keep class sizes low. This is a 2-way language immersion program which would suffer substantial harm if class sizes (especially in lower grades) got to large since 1/2 the kids start the program not being fluent or literate in Spanish and 1/2 are not fluent or literate in Spanish.
 
Kindergarten 25.6 to 1
 
 
First Grade 25 to 1
 
 
2nd Grade 29.6 to 1 
 
 
3rd Grade 27.8 to 1 
 
 
4th Grade 25.8 to 1 
 
 
5th Grade 25 to 1 
These lower class sizes pull the averages lower as a whole.
 
 
 
Example 2: Under enrolled schools (CUSD has 7) These are the Capo Forward Schools which CUSD spent a half million dollars to "re-brand".
 
 
These schools will pull the averages for other schools down.
 
RH Dana
  
Grade Teachers Students  Ratio
K 3 41 13.67
1st 3 42 14
2nd 2 49 24.5 
3rd 3 43 14.3 
4th 2 51 25.5 
5th 2 48 24 
 
 
 
Del Obispo
 
 
Hidden Hills
 
 
Kinoshita
 
 
Clarence Lobo
 
 
Marblehead
 
 
Wood Canyon
 
Compare that to Ladera Ranch Schools - The lack of equity is astounding- not legal and the use of "Average Class Sizes" covers up the truth.
 
 
Grade Teachers Students  Ratio
K 3 130 44
1st 5 134 26.8
2nd 5 131 32.75
3rd 4 146 36.5 
4th 4 155 38.75 
5th 5 152 30.4 
 
 
 
Example 3: Combo-Classes
 
Mixing grades because there is to many students for the number of teachers- for example A 3/4 Combo class will have 1/2 3rd graders and 1/2 4th graders.
 
If they have a Combo class of 30 kids total - 1/2 3rd Graders and 1/2 4th graders then on paper the will say there is a class of 15 3rd graders and a class of 15 4th graders which will also bring down the "average" for the District.
 
This covered the first 27 pages of the 87 page LCAP. This was the review of 2016-17 to see if CUSD met its goals. It did not. The remainder is projections for 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20.