June 12, 2019 CUSD BOT Meeting: INFORMATION/DISCUSSION/ACTION

 THIS ITEM HAS BEEN PULLED BY STAFF AND WILL NOT BE HEARD

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AGENDA ITEM #47

PRESENTATION ON THE SAN CLEMENTE HIGH SCHOOL ARCHITECTURAL APPROACH FOR MASTER PLAN AND RENDERINGS.

Information/Discussion

Board Agenda page 1,223

 

SCHOOL FACILITY BOND

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AGENDA ITEM #48

PRESENTATION ON THE SOUTHERN SCHOOL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT PROPOSED FACILITIES PROJECTS, TAX LEVY AMOUNT, BOUNDARIES AND TIMELINE:

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,231 Slide Presentation

Board Audio at 51:56

Introduction by Clark Hampton

Presentation by John Forney

Priority is to add air conditioning to San Clemente High Gym, Concoria Elementary and Los Palmas Elementary Schools

Board Audio at 56:18 Trustee Martha McNichilas Clarification on Air Conditioning

If matching funds are available from a State Bond then CUSD could do the following:

Slide on page 5 of 8 the "other" for San Clemente High is the Upper Campus $23 million for the Upper Campus

Replace portables with new permanent buildings.

Nothing will be able to be fixed if CUSD does not pass this bond because this bond is required to have access to state matching funds.

They want to exclude Meredith Canyon and Pacifica San Juan from the bond but still have this bond include Palasades Elementary. 

Meredith Canyon is opposed to a school site on Los Rambles.

If Meridth Canyon is excluded Net proceeds would be $113 million, not $116 million.

The Bond would exclude Talega and Pacifica San Juan.

PUBLIC COMMENT

Board Audio 1:05:44 Michelle Plossel Campbell

Wants the Board to move forward with Bond measures in both areas Souther District and Wester District as soon as possible.

TRUSTEE DISCUSSION

Board Audio 1:05:44 Clarification on what disrection Staff Needs.

Need Boundry, Amount and Time Line.

CUSD failed to Poll Meredith Canyon. 

San Juan Capistrano will not help CUSD pass a San Clemente Bond

Possibly dual boundary Meredith Canyon 

Vote to approve slide page 1,453 with removal of San Juan Capistrano from the boundary.

CUSDWatch Comment 

San Clemente Taxpayers be aware:

Total Bond Amount $120 million

$34 per $100,000 of assessed value

If you own a million dollar home that is $340 per year.

The estimated bond time frame is not currently being specifid in this presentation. 

CUSD's current plan is to exclude Talega residents from the bond, which means they are not going to allocate any bond funds to fix and maintain Talega schools even though CUSD has over collected millions of dollars in Mello Roos funds from Talega residents and used that money to build projects that did not benefit Talega residents. 

In addition, CUSD wants San Clemente Taxpayers to pay for repairs to Palisades Elementary School which is located in Capo Beach at an estimated cost of $4 million dollars (originally they asked San Clemente to pay $12.75 million for Palasades).  

I have stood before the Board many times and said San Clemente will not pay for Palisades Elementary school when Talega schools will not receive funds for their schools.

It is CUSDs' responsibility to fix and maintain all of San Clemente's schools BEFORE they increase employee compensation.

San Clemente High $87 million

  • New Construction $55 million
  • Renovtion $32 million

Note: In the slide on page 1234 renovations for SC high are $32 million. In the slide on page 1235 CUSD says $36 million. $4 million dollar discrepency (Palisades)

All other Schools $28 million + Palisades

Priority I: $19 million

Priority 2: $9 million

Note: all "other schools" would not get any funding for anything except emergency repairs and maintenance (those that threaten the health and safety of staff and students) No New Buildings and no Renovations.

 

 

SCHOOL FACILITY BOND

Aliso Viejo - Laguna Niguel - Dana Point

(also San Juan Capistrano)

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AGENDA ITEM #49

PRESENTATION UPDATE ON THE WESTERN SCHOOL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT FACILITIES NEEDS:

Information/Discussion

Board Agenda page 1,240 slide presentation

CUSDWatch Comment 

"Local" School Facility Bond Debt in California is now $169 Billion dollars. Repayment will cost California Taxpayers $337 Billion dollars. 

California's 2019-20 Total State budget is $214 billion

Orange County: $9 billion

LA County:  $45 billion

San Diego County $17 billion

Data: Local School Facility Bond Measures

School Districts are hungry for increased revenues in order to pay growing employee pension costs and  to provide increasing salaries and benefits to public employees.  90% of CUSD's total budget goes to public employee salaries, pensions and benefits. [page 1417] CUSD has given 5 consecutive years of across the board employee compensation increases totalling over $150 million dollars while CUSD has  chosen NOT to fix and maintain facilities.

 

CUSDWatch Comment 

San Clemente Taxpayers be aware:

Total Bond Amount $300 million

$34 per $100,000 of assessed value

If you own a million dollar home that is $340 per year.

The estimated bond time frame is not currently being specifid in this presentation. 

Dana Hills High $137 million

  • New Construction $76 million
  • Renovtion $61 million

Aliso Niguel High $93 million

  • New Construction $41 million
  • Renovation $52 million

Niguel Hills Middle School $45 million

  • New Construction $29 million
  • Renovation $16 million

All other schools $24 million

  • Priority I Maintenance $24 million

Note: all "other schools" would not get any funding for anything except emergency repairs and maintenance (those that threaten the health and safety of staff and students) No New Buildings and no Renovations which would require an additional $277 million dollars in bond funds.

  • New Construction $147 million
  • Renovation $130 million
  • Priority I Maintenance $24 million

The final slide shows that no San Juan Facilities will receive bond funds and San Juan Schools require an additional $242 million in needed facilities repairs and maintenance.

  • New Construction $219 million
  • Renovation $23 million

CUSD has chosen not fixed and maintained its facilities. 

 

 

CUSDWatch Comment 

"Local" School Facility Bond Debt in California is now $169 Billion dollars. Repayment will cost California Taxpayers $337 Billion dollars. 

California's 2019-20 Total State budget is $214 billion

Local School Facility Bond Debt

Data: Local School Facility Bond Measures

Orange County: $9 billion

LA County:  $45 billion

San Diego County $17 billion

School Districts are hungry for increased revenues in order to pay growing employee pension costs and to provide increasing salaries and benefits to public employees.  90% of CUSD's total budget goes to public employee salaries, pensions and benefits. [page 1417] CUSD has given 5 consecutive years of across the board employee compensation increases totalling over $150 million dollars while CUSD has chosen NOT to fix and maintain facilities.

NO MORE BOND MONEY TO FISCALLY IRRESPONSIBLE SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

It is time to break up large Unified school districts into smaller "local" districts where Cities can work to ensure that the educational needs of their taxpayers are met. 

Large Unified school districts have more political power then the Cities they represent. School Districts promote the political agendas of large public employee unions. School Districts no longer have the education of students as their number one priority.

That is why the California public education system has gone from #1 in the world to 46th in the Nation.

 

CFD-98-2: Ladera Ranch

Refinancing Possibilities

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AGENDA ITEM #50

CONTINUING FINANCIAL STEWARDSHIP OF COMMUNITY FACILITIES DISTRICTS: REFINANCING OPPORTUNITY FOR CFD 98-2 (LADERA):

Information/Discussion

Board Agenda page 1,262

FInancial Implications: Refinancing the Bonds will result in savings to taxpayers of $5.4 million dollars. 

Tax Reduction $1,016 to $953 saving $63 per home per year X 10 years. The average homeowner will save $630 over ten years.

"The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) recommends that “bond issuers sell their debt using the method of sale that is most likely to achieve the lowest cost of borrowing while taking into account both short-range and long-range implications for taxpayers and ratepayers.”

Community Facilities District (CFD) 98-2 (Ladera) was formed in fiscal year 1998-1999. The CFD is located within the community of Ladera Ranch and includes approximately 8,000 homes and 70 acres of commercial property. In 1999, approximately $105.3 million of bonds were issued to pay for school facilities operated by the District and water and sewer facilities operated by the Santa Margarita Water District.

The bonds originally issued in 1999 were first refinanced in 2005, and later refinanced again in 2015. The next opportunity to refinance the bonds is September 1, 2019. The bonds under consideration for refinancing have a term until 2029.

CSEA Employment Contract

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BOARD ACTION TO ADOPT DISTRICT’S INITIAL PROPOSAL TO CALIFORNIA SCHOOL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION FOR 2019-2020 NEGOTIATIONS:

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,278

Initial Proposal of CSEA to CUSD for Successor Contract Negotiations [page 1280]

Article 2- Recognition

Article 3- Hours of Employment and Overtime

  • Shift differential pay rate
  • compensatory time off

Article 4- Grievance Procedure

Article 5- Safety

Article 7- Transfers and Promotions

Article 8- Leaves

  • Personal necessity leaves
  • Leave of Absence for Continuing Education

Article 9 - Vacation

  • increasing vacation accruals

Article 10 - Holidays

Article 11- Wages

  • Salary increase
  • Creating additional step increases on the salary schedule
  • Early Retirement for 2019-20
  • Adding Specialized stipens for higher education

Article 12 - Health and Welfare Benefits

  • Having CUSD increase its contributions towards health benefits
  • modifying eligibility for retiree benefits
  • allowing part-time employees to receive benefits

Article 13- Association Rights

Article 14 - Organizationa; Security and Check Off

May 29, 2019 CUSD Initial Proposal to CSEA [page 1283]

Article 6-  Evaluation Procedures

Article 7: Transfers and Promotions

Article 11: Wages (and releated schedules and appendicies)

Article 12: Health and Welfare Benefits.

TEXT BOOKS

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AGENDA ITEM #52

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS RECOMMENDED FOR ADOPTION: ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS, GRADE 10-12: 

The Practice of Statistics, 6th edition textbook by Starnes and Tabor (published by Bedford, Freeman & Worth)

Financial Implecations: $73,293.12 from Lottery Funds

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,285

Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics is a course offered to students in grade 10-12 at all District comprehensive high schools, with 350-400 students enrolled in that course. Currently “Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis” (copyright 2001) is the adopted textbook used at Aliso Niguel High School, Capistrano Valley High School, Dana Hills High School, San Clemente High School, and Tesoro High School, and “Stats – Modeling the World – AP Edition” (copyright 2010) is the adopted textbook used at San Juan Hills High School. Neither text aligns with the current version of the AP Statistics test.

 

TEXT BOOKS

AGENDA ITEM #53

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS RECOMMENDED FOR ADOPTION: ELEMENTARY SCIENCE, GRADE K-5:

FOSS Next Generation Elementary ©2016 Delta Education, grade K-5.

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,288

Financial Implecations: $3,700,000 for 9 years Lottery Funds

With the last adoption outdated and not aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and California Science Framework, elementary school teachers have been using various resources and teacher created materials. The FOSS Next Generation K-5 curriculum is one of the state adopted curricula and has met the rigorous criteria of the state for this approval. Teachers in the elementary school grades piloted two state adopted curriculum, and recommended FOSS Next Generation K5 for its own merits and in consideration of a standards aligned curriculum.

History of NGSS Next Generation Science Standards for California Approved November 13, 2014

NGSS for California Public Schools, K-12

Kindergarten through Grade Five Standards

Standards Arranged by Disciplinary Core Ideas (Life, Earth and Space, and Physical Science)

Standards Arranged by Topic

(e.g., Chemical Reactions, Structure and Function, or Space Systems)

 

TEXT BOOKS

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AGENDA ITEM #54

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS RECOMMENDED FOR ADOPTION: SECONDARY WORLD LANGUAGE, GRADE 11-12:

No et Moi, Editions Jean-Claude Lattes ©2007

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,292

Financial Implecations: $700 funded by site funds

A change will take place for language B testing as of May 2020, requiring students to prepare 2 novels in French followed by a recorded oral exam in the target language. The French novel requested, No et Moi, offers an excellent match for the new 2020 IB language B themes of “identities” and “sharing the world”. This novel is written in eloquent and attainable French appropriate for the IB standard level readers. This novel was reviewed by the District Instructional Materials Review Committee in accordance with Board Policy 6161.1, Selection and Evaluation of Instructional Materials.

World Language Content Standards K- Grade 12 (2009). The Standards are being rewritten.   

2019 World Languages Standards Timeline The Schedule of Significant Events, or Timeline, for the revision of the 2019 WL Standards was approved by the SBE on September 13, 2017.

Statutory deadline for SBE action March 31, 2019

CUSDWatch Comment

2016 Selection of Non-SBE Adopted K-12 Instructional Materials: Process Resources and Tools- All curriculum is being rewritten to reflect "Social Content Guidelines".

Note: These are instructional materials NOT adopted by the State Board of Education

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TEXT BOOKS

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AGENDA ITEM #55

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS RECOMMENDED FOR ADOPTION: SECONDARY HISTORY SOCIAL SCIENCE, GRADE 12:

Global Politics (2nd Edition) Palgrave MacMillan ©2014

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,295

Financial Implecations: $2,000 funded by site funds.

2016 History-Social Science Framework

During the April 25, 2019, Board meeting, Trustees approved the addition of a new course of study, International Baccalaureate (IB) Global Politics Higher Level. This new interdisciplinary course, which is University of California (UC) a-g and honors approved, is for those potential IB students and other students who are interested in studying all aspects of the world from local issues to international relations.



TEXT BOOKS

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AGENDA ITEM #56

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS RECOMMENDED FOR ADOPTION: SECONDARY SCIENCE, GRADE 6-8:

STEMscopes California Next Generation Science Standards ©2018

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,298

Financial Implecations: $2,000,000 funded by Lottery Funds

In November 2018, the California State Board of Education adopted K-8 Science instructional materials aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The last adoption of science instructional materials in the District was 11 years ago in 2008. With students already being tested on the new standards, staff believed it important to secure aligned instructional materials for use by teachers in grades 6-8 by the 2019-2020 school year. In order to do this, a process was initiated to review materials for a potential adoption.

History of NGSS Next Generation Science Standards for California Approved November 13, 2014

NGSS for California Public Schools, 6-8

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AGENDA ITEM #57

2019-2020 BUDGET ADOPTION:

Discussion/Action

Board Agenda page 1,302

CUSDWatch Comment 

Budget Guidelines [page 1445]

Budget Assumptions [page 1448]

LCFF COLA [page 1449]

  • 2019-20: 3.46%
  • 2018-19: 2.71%
  • 2017-18: 0

Lottery Revenue [page 1449]

  • 2019-20: $9.2 million
  • 2018-19: $9.3 million
  • 2017-18: $8.8 million

Enrollment: [page 1413] CUSD has continuing declining enrollment (loss 2,168 stduents over 4 years)

  • 2019-20: 46,409
  • 2018-19: 47,051
  • 2017-18: 47,475
  • 2016-17: 48,577

ADA  per pupil [page 1448

  • 2019-20: $9,229
  • 2018-19: $8.822
  • 2017-18: $8,293 
  • 2016-17: 

LCFF Revenue [page 1413

  • 2021-22: $478 million
  • 2020-21: $472 million
  • 2019-20: $466 million
  • 2018-19: $455 million

Salaries & Benefits [page 1417

  • 2019-20: $364 million
  • 2018-19: $354 million
  • 2017-18: $349 million
  • 2016-17: $331 million

Status of Labor Agreements

CUEA (Teachers) 2019-20 not settled

Cost of 1% increase in salary & benefits $2,287,000  [page 1454

Budget includes 1.5% increase in step & column for 2019-20. [page 1433

CSEA (Classified) 2019-20 not settled

Cost of 1% increase in salary & benefits $852,000  [page 1434

Budget includes 2% increase in step & column for 2019-20. [page 1435

Management 2019-20 not settled

Cost of 1% increase in salary & benefits $312,000  [page 1436

Budget includes 1.5% increase in step & column for 2019-20. [page 1436

School Site Supply Budget No Change over last 4 years [page 1449

  • K - 5 $21/student
  • 6 - 8 $25/student
  • 9 - 12 $33/student

Staffing Formula: No Change over last 4 years [page 1449

  • K = 28.5 : 1
  • 1 – 3 = 30.0 : 1
  • 4 – 5 = 31.5 : 1
  • 6 – 8 = 32.5 : 1 
  • 9 – 12 = 34.5 : 1 

STEP & COLUMN included in budget [page 1449] :

  • CUEA 1.5%
  • CSEA 2.0%
  • CUMA 1.5%
  • Teamsters 2.0%

CalPERS Contributions:   [page 1449

  • 2024-25: 26.6% 
  • 2023-24: 26.4% 
  • 2022-23: 25.7%
  • 2021-22: 24.9% 
  • 2020-21: 23.6%
  • 2019-20: 20.733%

CalSTRS Contributions:   [page 1449

  • 2020-21: 18.10% into the future
  • 2019-20: 17.10%

Health & Welfare Benefits $47.5 million  [page 1450

The District will utilize the following employer rates for statutory benefits 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20
STRS  14.43%  16.28%   17.10%
PRS  15.53% 18.062% 20.70% 
QASDI  6.200%  6.200%  6.200%  
Medicare 1.450% 1.450% 1.450%
Workers Comp 1.450% 1.500% 1.500%
Unemployment 0.050% 0.050% 0.050%
OPEB - Active  0.08% 0.08% 0.08%
OPEB - All  0.27% 0.27% 0.90%

 

2019-20 Liability Insurance:  Cost up 7% to $3 million [page 1450] 

2019-20 Debt Service  [page 1451

  • $2.1 million Energy Bond (solar panels)
  • $3.3 million early retirement for CUEA/Teamsters
 

[page 1453]  

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CUSDWatch Comment

Governor Brown kept the Base Funding Grant intentionally low, which intentionally underfunded wealthy surban school districts (districts with a low percentage of students who are English Language Learners, receiving Free and Reduced Lucnh and/or are in Foster Care. He than gave these intentionally underfunded districts one time grant money to keep them afloat. There are no more "one time fund" being allocated so the budget is decreased by $7.755,964 million for 2019-20

The "Local Control Funding Formula" is unconstitutional. It is designed to promote a political agenda - to redistribute wealth, not educate children.

The "Base Grant" is universal for all students. 

The "Supplemental Grant" provides additional funding to districts based on the percentage of students in the district that are English Language Learners, Receiving Free and Reduced Lunch, and/or are in Foster Care. 

The "Concentration Grant" provides even more funding for districts that have large concentrations of students that are English Language Learners, Receiving Free and Reduced Lunch, and/or are in Foster Care. 

At page 1446 CUSD States: 

"14. One-time sources of funding shall not be used to facilitate ongoing expenditures."

That is a false assumption. CUSD uses one time sources aka fundraising and donations to pay for ongoing expenses like art, music, science, instructional  aids, librians, teacher release time etc.

At page 1446 CUSD States: 

"Reduction of 25 FTE from declining enrollment plus Step and Column increases. Budgeted reductions"

CUSD has some of the largest class sizes in the nation. Rather than reduce class sizes, CUSD is cutting 25 FTE teachers in order to pay for raises for the remaining teachers.